Lab Manual

The lab experiments listed below have been professionally authored, with the ability to be modified to your lab curriculum. All labs include step-by-step instructions and required equipment.

Lab Experiments
Equipment Required
Included with following Kits
Goals and Outcomes
Tutorial Equipment RequiredIncluded with following KitsGoals and Outcomes
TT-01: Tutorial with ECG
Learn how to use LabScribe and the iWorx systems using ECG.
IX-TA-ROAM, , ROAM-B2A HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will be able to successfully operate both the iWorx A/D converter and the LabScribe software.
2.	Students will be able to load the appropriate lab settings group and file, exercise, and attached lab courseware in PDF format for use during lab. 
3.	Students will be able to attach peripheral devices and transducers to the iWorx A/D converter.
4.	Students will be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have become skilled in the workings of the LabScribe software.
2.	have been able to successfully use the Load Group function to open the lab exercise and pdf courseware.
3.	feel comfortable attaching peripheral transducers to the A/D converter.
4.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values for pulse amplitude and heart rate.
TT-02: Tutorial with pulse
Learn how to use LabScribe and the iWorx systems using pulse.
IX-TA-ROAM, , PPG-320 HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will be able to successfully operate both the iWorx A/D converter and the LabScribe software.
2.	Students will be able to load the appropriate lab settings group and file, exercise, and attached lab courseware in PDF format for use during lab. 
3.	Students will be able to attach peripheral devices and transducers to the iWorx A/D converter.
4.	Students will be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have become skilled in the workings of the LabScribe software.
2.	have been able to successfully use the Load Group function to open the lab exercise and pdf courseware.
3.	feel comfortable attaching peripheral transducers to the A/D converter.
4.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values for pulse amplitude and heart rate.
Human Heart -Goals and OutcomesEquipment RequiredIncluded with following KitsGoals and Outcomes
HH-01: Electrocardiogram (ECG) and Peripheral Circulation
ECG and the effect of temperature on the body's limbs.
IX-TA-ROAM, , ROAM-B2A , PPG-320 HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will be able to successfully record a three-lead Electrocardiogram (ECG) and examine the relationship of the ECG to the peripheral circulation. 
2.	Students will be able to record and look at the effects of hot and cold on an ECG and pulse in the extremities.
3.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have recorded a recognizable ECG.
2.	have been able to interpret an ECG, especially the individual P and T waves, and the QRS complex.
3.	be able to calculate the heart rate of an individual from the recorded data.
4.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
5.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values for arterial pulse amplitude and heart rate, and the amplitudes of various ECG waves. 
6.	have been able to examine and interpret the effects of hot and cold on peripheral circulation.
HH-03: Exercise, the ECG and Peripheral Circulation
ECG and the effects of two forms of exercise, upper and lower limbs.
IX-TA-ROAM, , ROAM-B2A , PPG-320 , FT-220 HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will be able to successfully record a three-lead Electrocardiogram (ECG) and examine the relationship between the ECG and the peripheral circulation. 
2.	Students will be able to record and look at the effects of exercise on an ECG and pulse in different subjects during the lab period. 
3.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have recorded a recognizable ECG.
2.	have been able to interpret an ECG, especially the individual P and T waves, and the QRS complex.
3.	be able to calculate the heart rate of an individual from the recorded data.
4.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
5.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values for arterial pulse amplitude and heart rate, and the amplitudes of various ECG waves. 
6.	have been able to examine and interpret the effects of exercise on ECG and pulse amplitudes and timing.
HH-04: Six Lead ECG
Six lead ECG.
IX-TA-ROAM, , ROAM-B2A HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will be able to successfully record a six-lead Electrocardiogram (ECG) and interpret a six-lead ECG.
2.	Students will interpret data looking at the different ECG leads: I, II, III, aVL, aVR, and aVF.
3.	Students will be able to calculate amplitudes of the P, R and T waves; the QRS axis; and the heart angle from the data collected during recording. 
4.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have recorded a recognizable six-lead ECG.
2.	have been able to interpret an ECG, especially the individual P and T waves, the QRS complex, and answer questions about these waves. 
3.	be able to calculate the heart angle of an individual from the recorded data.
4.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
5.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values for arterial pulse amplitude and heart rate, and various ECG amplitudes. 
HH-05B: The Diving Reflex with Respiration rate
Study the mammalian diving reflex and also look at depth and rate of respiration.
IX-TA-ROAM, , ROAM-B2A , PPG-320 , RM-204

Goals

1.	Students will be able to successfully record a pulse using the plethysmograph.
2.	Students will be able to record and look at the effects of apnea, and facial immersion into both room temperature and cold water on the pulse wave. 
3.	As an optional exercise, students will be able to examine the effects of apnea, and facial immersion into both room temperature and cold water on respiration rate and depth. 
4.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have recorded a recognizable pulse wave and heart rate trace on a resting individual.
2.	have recorded a recognizable pulse wave and heart rate trace on an individual during apnea and facial immersion into room temperature and cold temperature water. 
3.	be able to calculate the pulse rate of an individual from the recorded data and understand the effects of the diving reflex.
4.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
5.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
6.	as an optional exercise have been able to examine and interpret the effects of apnea, and facial immersion into both room temperature and cold water on respiration rate and depth. 
HH-06: Heart Rate Variability
Heart rate variability using ECG.
IX-TA-ROAM, , ROAM-B2A HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will be able to successfully record a three-lead Electrocardiogram (ECG) and examine heart rate variability (HRV) while resting, after exercise and during a psychological test. 
2.	Students will be able to record and look at the effects of exercise and a stressful test on HRV.
3.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have recorded a recognizable ECG and be able to calculate the heart rate of an individual from the recorded data.
2.	have been able to interpret an ECG, especially the individual P and T waves, and the QRS complex.
3.	be able to interpret data to look at HRV after exercise and during a psychological test.
4.	answered questions about HRV and how HRV is influenced during times of “stress”.
5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
HH-08: Auscultation
Heart sounds using the heart sounds microphone, allows you to "see" as well as hear the heart sounds.
IX-TA-ROAM, , ROAM-B2A , HSM-220 HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will be able to successfully record a three-lead Electrocardiogram (ECG) and listen to heart sounds using a heart sounds microphone. 
2.	Students will be able to compare the ECG to the heart sounds and determine when the sounds occur during a cardiac cycle.
3.	Students will understand and be able to locate the 4 major auscultation areas on the chest.
4.	Students will monitor ECG and heart sounds under varying conditions.
5.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have recorded a recognizable ECG.
2.	have been able to interpret an ECG, especially the individual P and T waves, and the QRS complex.
3.	have calculated the ratio of the average area to the average duration of the heart sound integrals for the S1 and S2 heart sounds from each auscultation area. 
4.	have determined the relative amplitude of each heart sound from each auscultation area.
5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
6.	have been able to examine and interpret the heart sounds and when they occur in an ECG recording.
HH-09: ECG and Heart Sounds using an Electronic Stethoscope
Heart sounds using an electronic stethoscope, allows you to "see" as well as hear the heart sounds
IX-TA-ROAM, , ROAM-B2A , ES-300

Goals

1.	Students will be able to successfully record a three-lead Electrocardiogram (ECG) and listen to heart sounds using an electronic stethoscope. 
2.	Students will be able to use a stethoscope correctly and accurately.
3.	Students will understand and be able to locate the 4 major auscultation areas on the chest.
4.	Students will be able to compare the ECG to the heart sounds and determine when the sounds occur during a cardiac cycle.
5.	Students will monitor ECG and heart sounds under varying conditions.
6.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window.

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have recorded a recognizable ECG.
2.	have been able to interpret an ECG, especially the individual P and T waves, and the QRS complex.
3.	have calculated the ratio of the average area to the average duration of the heart sound integrals for the S1 and S2 heart sounds from each auscultation area. 
4.	have determined the relative amplitude of each heart sound from each auscultation area.
5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
6.	have been able to examine and interpret the heart sounds and when they occur in an ECG recording.
HH-10: 12-Lead Electrocardiograms (ECGs)
12-lead ECG; can use the ECG simulator as an add-on.
IX-TA-ROAM, , IWIRE-ECG12

Goals

1.	Students will be able to successfully record and interpret a 12-lead Electrocardiogram (ECG).
2.	Students will interpret data looking at the different ECG leads: I, II, III, aVL, aVR, and aVF, and the 6 chest leads.
3.	Students will be able to calculate amplitudes of the P, R and T waves; the QRS axis; and the heart angle from the data collected during recording. 
4.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have recorded a recognizable 12-lead ECG.
2.	have been able to interpret an ECG, especially the individual P and T waves, the QRS complex, and answer questions about these waves. 
3.	be able to calculate the heart angle of an individual from the recorded data.
4.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
5.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values for arterial pulse amplitude and heart rate, and various ECG amplitudes. 
HH-11: ECG ~ Simulations and Comparisons
ECG on both live subjects and while using the ECG simulator to look at a variety of arrythmias.
IX-TA-ROAM, , ROAM-B2A HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will be able to successfully record an Electrocardiogram (ECG) both on a live subject and using an ECG Simulator. 
2.	Students will be able to record a normal sinus rhythm both on the their subject and using the simulator.
3.	Students will be able to use the ECG simulator to record abnormal cardiac rhythms.
4.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have recorded a recognizable ECG with a normal sinus rhythm.
2.	be able to interpret an ECG, especially the individual P and T waves, and the QRS complex.
3.	be able to calculate the heart rate of an individual from the recorded data.
4.	be able to recognize and understand the differences in ECG recordings during abnormal cardiac situations.
5.	understand the physiology behind normal and abnormal cardiac rhythms.
6.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
7.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values for arterial pulse amplitude and heart rate, and the amplitudes of various ECG waves. 
HH-12: Pulse and Heart Rate Variability (HRV)
Heart rate variability using pulse.
IX-TA-ROAM, , PPG-320 HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will be able to successfully record pulse waves using a pulse plethysmograph and examine heart rate variability (HRV) while resting, after exercise and during a psychological test. 
2.	Students will be able to record and look at the effects of exercise and a stress-type test on HRV.
3.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have recorded recognizable pulse waves and be able to calculate the heart rate of an individual from the recorded data.
2.	be able to interpret data to look at HRV after exercise and during a psychological test.
3.	answered questions about HRV and how HRV is influenced during times of “stress”.
4.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
Human Muscle -Goals and OutcomesEquipment RequiredIncluded with following KitsGoals and Outcomes
HM-01: Grip Strength and the Electromyogram
Looks at EMG, strength and fatigue.
IX-TA-ROAM, , ROAM-B2A , FT-220 HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will successfully record electromyograms (EMGs).
2.	Students will learn how to calibrate a dynamometer and convert pounds to kilograms.
3.	Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the electric current from the nerves and the response of the muscle or muscle group being innervated. 
4.	Students should be able to measure the EMG produced and corresponding muscle force.
5.	Students will measure the force produced by the muscle in both the dominant and non-dominant forearms.
6.	Students will also study and measure the effect of fatigue on the muscles in the dominant and non-dominant forearms. Comparison of the measurement will also be examined. 
7.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	understand and be able to record an EMG.
2.	understand how nerves send electrical signals to muscles to cause a response.
3.	be able to determine the relationship between nerve impulses and the resulting EMG recording.
4.	have gained understanding of the reasons for different responses in the dominant and non-dominant forearm, and the correlation between fatigue and muscle strength. 
5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
6.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
HM-02: Electromyogram Activity in Antagonistic Muscles
EMG activity in antagonistic muscles.
IX-TA-ROAM, , ROAM-B2A HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will successfully record electromyograms (EMGs) from antagonistic muscle groups in both the forearm and lower leg.
2.	Students will learn how levers, fulcrums, and load affect the workings of antagonistic muscles.
3.	Students will gain an understanding of the muscle groups involved in flexion, extension, dorsiflexion and plantar flexion.
4.	Students will use weights to put load on muscles groups while examining changes in the EMG.
5.	Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the electric current from the nerves and the response of the muscle or muscle group being innervated. 
6.	Students should be able to measure the EMG produced and corresponding muscle force.
7.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	understand and be able to record an EMG.
2.	understand how nerves send electrical signals to muscles to cause a response.
3.	be able to determine the relationship between antagonistic muscles during movement.
4.	have gained understanding of the relationship between load and muscle activity.
5.	have measured the EMG force difference between muscle groups without and without lifting a weight.
6.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
7.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
HM-03: Oculomotor Muscle Activity
Electroculogram - looks at the muscle activity while doing a variety of different tasks including pursuit and vergences.
IX-TA-ROAM, , ROAM-B2A HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will successfully record electroculograms (EOGs) from the oculomotor muscle group of the eye.
2.	Students will learn how the six oculomotor muscles control eye movement during saccades, pursuit, the vestibular ocular reflex (VOR), and vergence. 
3.	Students will perform tasks that will generate electrical activity in oculomotor muscles that are unique to each of four different types of eye movement (saccades, VOR, pursuit, and vergence). 
4.	Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the electric current from the nerves and the response of the muscle or muscle group being innervated. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	understand and be able to record an EOG.
2.	understand how nerves send electrical signals to muscles to cause a response.
3.	be able to determine the relationship between saccades and reading; pursuit and following a moving target; VOR and head rotation; and vergence and focusing near to far. 
4.	have measured the EOG amplitude to determine the motion of the subject’s eyes during various oculomotor activities.
5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
6.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
HM-04: Stimulus Response, Work, Summation and Tetanus in Human Muscles
Use the built in stimulator to look at threshold, work, summation, incomplete and complete tetanus in muscles.
IX-TA-ROAM, , C-HVS-SL2 , SMT-220 HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR, NBK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will learn how to apply a stimulus pulse to human muscle to elicit a muscular contraction.
2.	Students will record finger twitches to be able to recognize contraction and relaxation times and twitch amplitudes.
3.	Students will demonstrate the effect of increasing stimulus strength on the strength of a muscle contraction, the effect of 
•	increasing weight on twitch amplitude and work of a preloaded muscle, 
•	increasing the frequency of stimulation on the contraction strength and muscle fatigue. 
4.	Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the electric current from the nerves and the response of the muscle or muscle group being innervated. 
5.	Students should be able to measure the EMG produced and corresponding muscle force.
6.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	understand and be able to record a simple finger twitch.
2.	understand how nerves send electrical signals to muscles to cause a response.
3.	be able to determine the relationship between stimulus and muscle twitch amplitudes.
4.	understand the concepts of muscle recruitment, fatigue, summation, and tetanus
5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
6.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
HM-05: Flexibility and Range of Motion
Allows determination of the range of motion and flexibility of the subject. Looks at hypo- and hyper- extension situations.
IX-TA-ROAM, , GN-100 UHK-TR, UAHK-TR, UBIK-TR, NBK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will successfully record electromyograms (EMGs) from antagonistic muscle groups in both the forearm and lower leg.
2.	Students will learn how levers, fulcrums, and load affect the workings of antagonistic muscles.
3.	Students will gain an understanding of the muscle groups involved in flexion, extension, dorsiflexion and plantar flexion.
4.	Students will use a goniometer to measure angle of motion and flexibility of muscle groups.
5.	Students will gain an understanding of how the range of motion determines the joint’s functionality.
6.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	understand and be able to record an EMG.
2.	understand how flexibility and range of motion are used by physical therapists and athletic trainers when looking at joint dysfunction.. 
3.	be able to determine the relationship between antagonistic muscles during movement and how that related to range of motion..
4.	understand how flexion and extension of joints with and without weights affects the range of motion of that joint.
5.	gain an understanding of why different joints have different flexibilities and ranges of motion in certain directions.
6.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
7.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
HM-06: M-wave and Range of Motion with Stimulation of Antagonistic Muscles
Uses the simulator to see what happens when you stimulate antagonistic muscles.
IX-TA-ROAM, , ROAM-B2A , GN-100 , C-HVS-SL2 UHK-TR, UAHK-TR, UBIK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will learn how to apply a stimulus pulse to human muscle to elicit a muscular contraction.
2.	Students will record finger twitches to be able to recognize contraction and relaxation times and twitch amplitudes.
3.	Students will gain an understanding of the muscle groups involved in flexion, extension, dorsiflexion and plantar flexion.
4.	Students will use a goniometer to measure angle of motion and flexibility of muscle groups.
5.	Students will gain an understanding of how the range of motion determines the joint’s functionality.
6.	Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the electric current from the nerves and the response of the muscle or muscle group being innervated. 
7.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	understand and be able to record a simple muscle twitch.
2.	understand how nerves send electrical signals to muscles to cause a response.
3.	be able to determine the relationship between stimulus and muscle twitch amplitudes.
4.	understand contraction and relaxation times of muscles.
5.	understand how stimulus frequency compares to the ranges of motion for dorsiflexion and plantar flexion of the foot, and flexion and extension of both the wrist, elbow and knee. 
6.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
7.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
HM-07: Electromyogram (EMG) Activity in Antagonistic Muscles and Range of Motion
EMG, flexibility and range of motion of different joints and muscles.
IX-TA-ROAM, , ROAM-B2A , GN-100 UHK-TR, UAHK-TR, UBIK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will successfully record electromyograms (EMGs) from antagonistic muscle groups in both the forearm and lower leg.
2.	Students will learn how levers, fulcrums, and load affect the workings of antagonistic muscles.
3.	Students will gain an understanding of the muscle groups involved in flexion, extension, dorsiflexion and plantar flexion.
4.	Students will use a goniometer to measure angle of motion and flexibility of muscle groups.
5.	Students will gain an understanding of how the range of motion determines the joint’s functionality.
6.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	understand and be able to record an EMG.
2.	understand how flexibility and range of motion are used by physical therapists and athletic trainers when looking at joint dysfunction.. 
3.	be able to determine the relationship between antagonistic muscles during movement and how that related to range of motion..
4.	understand how flexion and extension of joints with and without weights affects the range of motion of that joint.
5.	gain an understanding of why different joints have different flexibilities and ranges of motion in certain directions.
6.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
7.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
HM-08: Electromyogram (EMG) Activity while Arm Wrestling
EMG activity while the subjects are arm-wrestling.
IX-TA-ROAM, , ROAM-B2A HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will successfully record electromyograms (EMGs) from antagonistic muscle groups in the forearm, upper arm and shoulder.
2.	Students will learn how levers, fulcrums, and load affect the workings of antagonistic muscles.
3.	Students will gain an understanding of the muscle groups involved in flexion and extension while performing a specific task.
4.	Students will put load on muscles groups while examining changes in the EMG.
5.	Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the muscle action and function using preselected muscles and then using muscles groups for studying their own hypotheses. 
6.	Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the electric current from the nerves and the response of the muscle or muscle group being innervated. 
7.	Students should be able to measure the EMG produced and corresponding muscle force.
8.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window.

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	understand and be able to record an EMG.
2.	understand how nerves send electrical signals to muscles to cause a response.
3.	be able to determine the relationship between antagonistic muscles during movement.
4.	have gained understanding of the relationship between load and muscle activity.
5.	have measured the EMG force difference between muscle groups while performing a specific task.
6.	have designed optional experiments or muscle groups and test varied hypotheses.
7.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
8.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
HM-09: Kinesiology and Electromyogram (EMG) Activity in Targeted Muscles
EMG in "active" muscle groups to make sure that the exercise routine is being done properly.
IX-TA-ROAM, , IWIRE-B3G AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, NBK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will successfully record electromyograms (EMGs) from muscle groups in leg.
2.	Students will learn how levers, fulcrums, and load affect the workings of  muscles.
3.	Students will gain an understanding of the muscle groups involved in flexion, extension,  abduction, adduction, etc...
4.	Students will use weights to put load on muscles groups while examining changes in the EMG.
5.	Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the electric current from the nerves and the response of the muscle or muscle group being innervated. 
6.	Students should be able to measure the EMG produced and corresponding muscle force.
7.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	understand and be able to record an EMG.
2.	understand how nerves send electrical signals to muscles to cause a response.
3.	be able to determine the relationship between different muscles during movement.
4.	have gained understanding of the relationship between load and muscle activity.
5.	have measured the EMG force difference between muscle groups without and without doing a specific activity.
6.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
7.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
HM-10: The Electrogastrogram (EGG) and Growling Stomach
Intestinal activity in humans before and after eating.
IX-TA-ROAM, , ROAM-B2A HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

Outcomes

Human Nerve -Goals and OutcomesEquipment RequiredIncluded with following KitsGoals and Outcomes
HN-01: Auditory and Visual Reflexes
The study of whether sight or sound stimuli cause a faster reaction time. Uses preprogrammed sequences to show color and play sound.
IX-TA-ROAM, , EM-220 HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR, NBK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will gain an understanding of a reflex arc and how the spinal cord and peripheral nerves function in the human body
2.	Students will be able to successfully record responses from subjects to auditory and visual stimuli.
3.	Students should be able to measure the response time of their subjects to different cues and relate it to the functioning of the spinal nerves. 
4.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	understand and be able to draw a reflex arc.
2.	have recorded responses of subjects to both auditory and visual stimuli.
3.	determine a subject’s response time to various cues.
4.	be able to determine the effect of different types of auditory cues on response time.
5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
6.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
HN-02: Stretch Receptors and Reflexes with Reflex Hammer
Uses a reflex hammer to look at myotactic responses in the knee and ankle.
IX-TA-ROAM, , ROAM-B2A , PRH-200 UHK-TR, UAHK-TR, UBIK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will successfully trigger and record electromyograms (EMGs) using a reflex hammer and iWorx software, respectively.
2.	Students will gain an understanding of the muscles in the leg and how they work and respond to stimuli.
3.	Students will gain an understanding of the both the Achilles and patellar stretch reflexes and the reflex arc.
4.	Students should be able to measure the conduction times and nerve velocities for the Achilles and patellar reflexes using electromyograms (EMGs). 
5.	Students will measure the effect of pre-existing tension in the effector muscle, or motor activity in other muscle groups, upon reflex responses. 
6.	Students will also study the coordination of motor activity in antagonistic muscles.
7.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	understand and be able to draw a reflex arc.
2.	have recorded EMG responses of subjects to stimulation of the Achilles and patellar tendons using a reflex hammer.
3.	be able to determine the conduction times and nerve velocities using EMG recordings.
4.	have measured the effect of pre-existing tension on muscles or muscle groups.
5.	have gained understanding of the reasons for different conduction and reaction times of reflexes at different locations on the human body. 
6.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
7.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
HN-03: Human Nerve Conduction Velocity
Ulnar nerve conduction.
IX-TA-ROAM, , ROAM-B2A , C-HVS-SL2 HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will gain an understanding of how a stimulus is applied to a nerve to gain a response.
2.	Students will gain an understanding of the Compound Action Potential (CAP) generated by a nerve as a response to a stimulus.
3.	Students will be able to successfully measure CAPs of the nerves in the forearm.
4.	Students will gain an understanding of summation and the relationship to nerve conduction velocity.
5.	Students will understand the relationship between stimulus strength and the amplitude of the nerve/muscle response; the latency of the nerve as a function of the polarity of the stimulus pulse; and the nerve conduction velocity. 
6.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:

1.	have gained an understand of the effect of stimulus strength of the response of the innervated muscle.
2.	understand how the amplitude of the CAP relates to threshold.
3.	have gained an understanding of how the polarity of the stimulus pulse effects the latency and amplitude of the CAP.
4.	have calculated the nerve conduction velocity of the ulnar nerve and understand how that relates to the functionality of the nerve/muscle response. 
5.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 
HN-04: Hand vs. Foot Reactions
The study of whether sight or sound stimuli cause a faster reaction time using both the foot sensor and hand event marker.
IX-TA-ROAM, , EM-220 , FRS-220 PK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will gain an understanding of a reflex arc and how the spinal cord and peripheral nerves function in the human body
2.	Students will be able to successfully record responses from subjects to auditory and visual stimuli on reactions of both the hand and the foot. 
3.	Students should be able to measure the response time of their subjects to different cues and relate it to the functioning of the spinal nerves. 
4.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	understand and be able to draw a reflex arc.
2.	have recorded responses of subjects to both auditory and visual stimuli.
3.	determine a subject’s response time to various cues using the hand vs. the foot - looking at eye-hand vs. eye-foot coordination.
4.	be able to determine the effect of using different body parts on response time to various cues.
5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
6.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
HN-06: Hoffman Reflex using the Soleus Muscle
Soleus muscle stimulation to enable the determination of the H and M reflexes.
IX-TA-ROAM, , ROAM-B2A , C-HVS-SL2 HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will gain an understanding of how a stimulus is applied to a nerve to gain a response.
2.	Students will gain an understanding of the Compound Action Potential (CAP) generated by a nerve as a response to a stimulus.
3.	Students will be able to successfully measure CAPs of the nerves in the lower leg, specifically those for the soleus muscle.
4.	Students will investigate the H-reflex response and the M-wave response during muscle stimulation. 
5.	Students will design optional exercises, including but not limited to:
◦	using the Jendrassik maneuver and determine the result on the Hoffman Reflex.
◦	adding a small weight to the foot.
◦	altering the temperature, using either an ice pack or moist heat pack, to determine the H-reflex in both situations.
◦	collecting a maximal M-wave. Calculate the Hmax:Mmax ratio which is the standard for reporting in sports medicine. 
6.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:

1.	have gained an understand of the effect of stimulus strength of the response of the innervated muscle.
2.	understand how the amplitude of the CAP relates to threshold.
3.	be able to design their own hypothesis and carry out the experiment to record and collect data accurately.
4.	understand that different parameters can have varying effect on the CAP action and muscle response.
5.	 feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
6.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
HN-07: Median Nerve Conduction Velocity
Nerve conduction in the median nerve of the arm.
IX-TA-ROAM, , ROAM-B2A , C-HVS-SL2 HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will gain an understanding of how a stimulus is applied to a nerve to gain a response.
2.	Students will gain an understanding of the Compound Action Potential (CAP) generated by a nerve as a response to a stimulus.
3.	Students will be able to successfully measure CAPs of the nerves in the forearm.
4.	Students will gain an understanding of summation and the relationship to nerve conduction velocity.
5.	Students will understand the relationship between stimulus strength and the amplitude of the nerve/muscle response; the latency of the nerve as a function of the polarity of the stimulus pulse; and the nerve conduction velocity. 
6.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:

1.	have gained an understand of the effect of stimulus strength of the response of the innervated muscle.
2.	understand how the amplitude of the CAP relates to threshold.
3.	have gained an understanding of how the polarity of the stimulus pulse effects the latency and amplitude of the CAP.
4.	have calculated the nerve conduction velocity of the ulnar nerve and understand how that relates to the functionality of the nerve/muscle response. 
5.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 
HN-08: Human To Human Interface
Introduction to Neuroprosthetics and Human-to-Human Muscle Control
IX-TA-ROAM, , ROAM-B2A , FT-220 , C-HVS-SL2 HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR,

Goals

Outcomes

HN-09: Game Show Physiology
A new way to study - play Jeopardy using the iWorx system and study the physiological effects.
IX-TA-ROAM, , PPG-320 , EM-220 HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

Outcomes

HN-10: Play Games - Hypothesis Testing
See how playing a variety of different carnival games can help students learn physiology concepts
IX-TA-ROAM, , PPG-320 , RPD-320 , ROAM-B2A , A-RM-220 UHK-TR, UAHK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

Outcomes

HN-11: Visual Reflexes and Color Stimulation
Using sequences to show a variety of colored squares to measure reaction time in response to different color.
IX-TA-ROAM, , EM-220 , EM-220 HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR, NBK-TR,

Goals

Outcomes

HN-12: Sensory and motor nerve conduction velocities of median nerve of both the dominant and nondominant limbs.
Study the differences in motor and sensory nerve conduction in right and left handed individuals.
IX-TA-ROAM, , ROAM-B2A , C-HVS-SL2 HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR,

Goals

Outcomes

HN-13: Conditioned Response to stimuli
Reaction time measurements will be made from an individual shown a neutral visual stimulus and then to that same neutral stimulus when a small shock is applied IF the reaction is not fast enough.
IX-TA-ROAM, , EM-220 , C-HVS-SL2 HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR, NBK-TR,

Goals

Outcomes

HN-14A: Senses - Eye and Ear
Measures action potential of the eye using the spike sorting module.
IX-TA-ROAM, , NMD-SYS

Goals

Outcomes

HN-14B: Senses - Eye and Ear
Measures actional potentials of the ear using the spike sortng module
IX-TA-ROAM, , NMD-SYS

Goals

Outcomes

Human Circulation -Goals and OutcomesEquipment RequiredIncluded with following KitsGoals and Outcomes
HC-01: Blood Pressure, Peripheral Circulation and Body Position
Human blood pressure looking at various positions of the arms, legs and entire body.
IX-TA-ROAM, , PPG-320 , BP-220 HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will be able to successfully record pulse waves using a plethysmograph, and blood pressure using a non-invasive blood pressure cuff (sphygmomanometer). 
2.	Students will be able to interpret data from these recordings and understand the difference between systolic and diastolic blood pressure. 
3.	Students will look at the effects of different cuff and body positions on pulse and blood pressure.
4.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have successfully calibrated a non-invasive blood pressure cuff.
2.	have recorded recognizable pulse and blood pressure waves and be able to calculate the pulse rate and blood pressure of an individual from the recorded data. 
3.	have been able to interpret the effects of different cuff and body positions on both pulse and blood pressure.
4.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
HC-02: Blood Pressure, Peripheral Circulation and Imposed Conditions
Human blood pressure while asking the subject to do different activities.
IX-TA-ROAM, , PPG-320 , BP-220 HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will be able to successfully record pulse waves using a plethysmograph, and blood pressure using a non-invasive blood pressure cuff (sphygmomanometer). 
2.	Students will be able to interpret data from these recordings and understand the difference between systolic and diastolic blood pressure. 
3.	Students will look at the effects of imposed conditions doing either short- or long- term experiments. The effects of food additives, exercise, apnea and temperature changes may be examined. 
4.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have successfully calibrated a non-invasive blood pressure cuff.
2.	have recorded recognizable pulse and blood pressure waves and be able to calculate the pulse rate and blood pressure of an individual from the recorded data. 
3.	have been able to interpret the effects of different imposed conditions on both pulse and blood pressure.
4.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
HC-03: Pulse Wave Velocity
Pulse wave velocity in human subjects.
IX-TA-ROAM, , PPG-320 , ROAM-B2A HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will be able to successfully record pulse waves using a plethysmograph and a three-lead electrocardiogram (ECG).
2.	Students will be able to interpret data from these recordings and understand the amplitudes and values of the ECG waves.
3.	Students calculate pulse wave velocity from the ECG and pulse recording data in a resting subject and in subjects after exercise. 
4.	Students can perform an optional exercise to determine the effect of different temperatures on the pulse wave velocity.
5.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have successfully recorded pulse waves and an ECG.
2.	have been able to calculate the pulse rate and ECG amplitudes of an individual from the recorded data.
3.	have been able to calculate the normal resting pulse wave velocity (PWV) and the PWV after hand exercises.
4.	been able to calculate the normal resting pulse wave velocity (PWV) and the PWV after the forearm has been exposed to different temperatures (Optional). 
5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
HC-04: Pulse Contour Analysis
The study of pulse wave velocity and arterial stiffness.
IX-TA-ROAM, , PPG-320 , BP-220 HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will be able to successfully record pulse waves using a plethysmograph and blood pressure using a non-invasive blood pressure cuff (sphygmomanometer). 
2.	Students will be able to interpret data from these recordings and understand the difference between systolic and diastolic blood pressure. 
3.	Students will determine the arterial stiffness, vascular tone, and blood pressures of individual subjects.
4.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have successfully calibrated a non-invasive blood pressure cuff.
2.	have recorded recognizable pulse and blood pressure waves and be able to calculate the pulse rate and blood pressure of an individual from the recorded data. 
3.	interpret the collected data to determine the Student Stiffness Index (SSI) of the subject’s major arteries.
4.	determine the Student Reflection Index (SRI), the indicator of vascular tone in the subject’s large vessels.
5.	understand systolic and diastolic blood pressure and make a determination as to whether the subject is hypo-, hyper- or normo-tensive. 
6.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
HC-05: Body Position, Exercise and Cardiac Output
Study the cardiac output of a subject during various condition, including exercise and body positions.
IX-TA-ROAM, , PPG-320 , BP-220 HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will be able to successfully record pulse waves using a plethysmograph and blood pressure using a non-invasive blood pressure cuff (sphygmomanometer). 
2.	Students will be able to interpret data from these recordings and understand the difference between systolic and diastolic blood pressure. 
3.	Students will determine the cardiac output and stroke volume of a subject in various body positions.
4.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have successfully calibrated a non-invasive blood pressure cuff.
2.	have recorded recognizable pulse and blood pressure waves and be able to calculate the cardiac output and stroke volume of an individual from the recorded data. 
3.	interpret the collected data to determine the systolic and diastolic pressures, and cardiac output of the subject in the reclining, sitting, and standing positions. 
4.	compare systolic and diastolic pressures, and cardiac output of the subject in the reclining, sitting, and standing positions.
5.	understand systolic and diastolic blood pressure and make a determination as to whether the subject is hypo-, hyper- or normo-tensive. 
6.	compare blood pressures and cardiac output of a subject at various times after exercise.
7.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
Human Exercise -Goals and OutcomesEquipment RequiredIncluded with following KitsGoals and Outcomes
HE-01: Metabolism and Thermal Response to Exercise
Looks at metabolism while the subject is exercising. Indirect measurements, does not use a gas analyzer.
IX-TA-ROAM, , PPG-320 HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will be able to successfully record a pulse using the plethysmograph.
2.	Students will be able to calibrate the temperature sensor to accurately measure body skin temperature.
3.	Students will be able to examine sweat gland density of subjects at rest.
4.	Students should be able to measure the changes in the heart rate, skin temperature, core temperature, and active sweat gland density of subjects during exercise and recovery from exercise. 
5.	Students will be able to perform a variety of mathematical calculations to determine the amount of work performed, energy used, oxygen consumed, net mechanical efficiency, heat storage, and evaporative heat loss during the course of the experiment. 
6.	Students will then determine a subject’s metabolic and thermal response at rest and during exercise; and calculate relative cardiac health by looking at recovery from exercise. 
7.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have recorded both a recognizable pulse wave and skin temperature trace on a resting individual.
2.	have recorded a recognizable pulse wave and skin temperature trace on an individual during and after exercise.
3.	be able to determine the pulse rate of an individual from the recorded data and understand the effects of exercise on pulse rate and body temperature. 
4.	calculate net mechanical efficiency and evaporative heat loss in order to understand the metabolic and thermal responses to exercise. 
5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
6.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
7.	as an additional analysis, have calculated the subject’s relative cardiac health by examining the time it takes the subject’s heart rate to return to normal after exercising. 
HE-02: Recovery from Exercise
Looks at the charges in heart rate while recovering from a variety of different exercises.
IX-TA-ROAM, , PPG-320 HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will be able to successfully record a pulse using the plethysmograph.
2.	Students should be able to measure the changes in the heart rate during exercise and recovery from exercise.
3.	Students will be able to determine a subject’s overall “Fitness Rating” based on the time it takes the heart rate to return to normal after exercise. 
4.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have recorded a recognizable pulse wave at rest.
2.	have recorded a recognizable pulse wave on an individual during and after exercise.
3.	be able to determine the pulse rate of an individual from the recorded data and understand the effects of exercise on pulse rate.
4.	determine a subject’s overall fitness and heart health after examining pulse rate recovery from exercise.
5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
6.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
Human Exercise-iWireGA -Goals and OutcomesEquipment RequiredIncluded with following KitsGoals and Outcomes
HE-04: RMR and Submax VO2(RER) Testing
RMR (Resting metabolic rate or basal metabolic rate if the subject has fasted for 12 hours. Generally a resting test.) or Submax VO2 RER testing.
IX-TA-ROAM, , iWire-GA1 , A-GAK-201-ES , A-CS-3L , A-FH-1000 HEK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will learn how to use and calibrate an O2/CO2 Gas Analyzer.
2.	Students will learn how to measure breathing parameters using a spirometer and mixing chamber.
3.	Students will use spirometry data to measure VO2, VCO2, and RER.
4.	Students will calculate the proportion of fat and carbohydrates utilized while the subject was resting, hyperventilating, recovering from hyperventilation, and recovering from light or moderate exercise. 
5.         Students will measure oxygen consumption and use four formulas to determine the subject’s heat production, and predicted and observed metabolic rates at the time of the experiment. 
6.	Students will also determine the metabolic rate of the subject after recovering from moderate exercise.
7.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have recorded a recognizable breathing pattern using a spirometer.
2.	have recorded recognizable expired oxygen and expired carbon dioxide curves.
3.	be able to determine relative VO2 and VCO2.
4.	be able to determine the RER and RMR from their subject at rest and during various testing protocols.
5.	be able to understand how VO2, VCO2, RER and RMR are affected by changes in breathing patterns.
6.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
7.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
HE-08: Regulation of Body Temperature and Respiratory Exchange Ratio (RER)
Looks at how changes in body temperature can affect RER.
IX-TA-ROAM, , iWire-GA1 , A-FH-300 , PPG-320 , A-CS-3L HEK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will learn how to use and calibrate an O2/CO2 Gas Analyzer.
2.	Students will learn how to measure breathing parameters using a spirometer.
3.	Students will use spirometry data and breath by breath analysis to measure VO2, VCO2, and RER of a subject while resting, while body temperature is raised (and the body is using energy to keep cool), and while cooling the body (using energy to keep warm). 
4.	Students will calculate the proportion of fat and carbohydrates utilized while the subject was resting and while the subject was placed at various body temperatures. 
5.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have recorded a recognizable breathing pattern using a spirometer.
2.	have recorded recognizable expired oxygen and expired carbon dioxide curves.
3.	be able to determine relative VO2 and VCO2.
4.	be able to determine the RER from their subject at rest and during various testing protocols.
5.	be able to understand how VO2, VCO2 and RER are affected by changes in body temperature.
6.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
7.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
HE-13: Fat burning zone
Use the Met Cart to figure out if there really is a Fat-Burning zone.
IX-TA-ROAM, , iWire-GA1 , A-GAK-201-ES , IX-ANT-SCOSCHE , A-FH-1000 HEK-TR,

Goals

Outcomes

Human Spirometry -Goals and OutcomesEquipment RequiredIncluded with following KitsGoals and Outcomes
HS-01: Breathing Parameters at Rest and After Exercise
Lung volumes before and after exercise.
IX-TA-ROAM, , A-FH-300 HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, UBIK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will be able to successfully record respiratory cycles.
2.	Students should be able to measure respiration volumes including: tidal volume, reserve capacities, vital capacity, and be able to calculate overall lung volume. 
3.	Students will be able to determine the difference in lung volumes of a subject at rest, immediately after exercise, and up to a few minutes after exercise. 
4.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have recorded a recognizable respiratory cycle at rest.
2.	have recorded recognizable respiratory cycles on an individual immediately after exercise and a few minutes after exercise.
3.	be able to determine the respiratory volumes of an individual from the recorded data and understand the effects of exercise on lung volumes. 
4.	determine a subject’s overall fitness and lung health after examining breathing rate recovery from exercise.
5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
6.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
HS-02: Breathing and Gravity
Lung volumes while the subject is in different positions - lying, sitting, standing.
IX-TA-ROAM, , A-FH-300 HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, UBIK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will be able to successfully record respiratory cycles.
2.	Students should be able to measure respiration volumes including: tidal volume, reserve capacities, vital capacity, and be able to calculate overall lung volume. 
3.	Students will examine the effects of gravity on breathing by measuring the differences in lung volumes of a resting subject while he or she is sitting, standing, or lying down. 
4.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have recorded a recognizable respiratory cycle at rest.
2.	have recorded recognizable respiratory cycles on an individual while he or she is sitting, standing and lying down.
3.	be able to determine the respiratory volumes of an individual from the recorded data and understand the effects of gravity on lung volumes. 
4.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
5.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
HS-03: Factors that Affect Breathing Patterns
Lung volumes whole the subject is asked to perform different tasks.
IX-TA-ROAM, , A-FH-300 HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, UBIK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will be able to successfully record respiratory cycles.
2.	Students should be able to measure respiration volumes including: tidal volume, reserve capacities, vital capacity, and be able to calculate overall lung volume. 
3.	Students will examine how factors, like concentrating on the completion of a task or sitting up quickly, influence breathing.
4.	Students will record and measure lung volumes during these tasks and answer questions based on the data collected.
5.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have recorded a recognizable respiratory cycle at rest.
2.	have recorded recognizable respiratory cycles on an individual while performing different tasks like concentrating on the completion of a problem or sitting up quickly. 
3.	be able to determine the respiratory volumes of an individual from the recorded data and understand the effects of these tasks on lung volumes. 
4.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.

5.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
HS-04: Lung Volumes and Heart Rate
Lung volumes and heart rate and how they are related to each other.
IX-TA-ROAM, , A-FH-300 , PPG-320 HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, UBIK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will be able to successfully record respiratory cycles and pulse waves.
2.	Students should be able to measure tidal volume and be able to calculate both breathing and heart rate.
3.	Students will determine the heart rate and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) prominence of a subject breathing at rest.
4.	Students will also determine the effect of apnea, different inhalation volumes, and the movement of the muscles involved in breathing on heart rate. 
5.	Students will record and measure lung volumes during these tasks and answer questions based on the data collected.
6.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have recorded recognizable respiratory cycles and pulse waves.
2.	be able to measure tidal volume amplitudes, and calculate breathing and heart rate.
3.	be able to determine the effects of apnea, use of different muscle groups and inhalation volumes on heart rate.
4.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
5.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
HS-05: Breathing Techniques and Heart Rate
A variety of different breathing patterns and how both lung volume and heart rate are affected.
IX-TA-ROAM, , PPG-320 , A-RM-220 UHK-TR, UAHK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will be able to successfully record respiratory cycles and pulse waves.
2.	Students should be able to measure tidal volume and be able to calculate both breathing and heart rate.
3.	Students will determine the heart rate and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) prominence of a subject breathing at rest.
4.	Students will also determine the effect of apnea, shallow abdominal breathing, rapid bellows breathing, and deep abdominal breathing on heart rate.
5.	Students will record and measure lung volumes during these tasks and answer questions based on the data collected.
6.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have recorded recognizable respiratory cycles and pulse waves.
2.	be able to measure and calculate breathing and heart rates.
3.	be able to determine the effects of apnea, use of different muscle groups and inhalation volumes on heart rate.
4.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
5.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
HS-08: Restrictive and Obstructive Airway Diseases
The study of normal and abnormal breathing - how does it feel to have asthma or COPD?
IX-TA-ROAM, , A-FH-300 , A-SP-RS

Goals

1.	Students will be able to successfully record resting respiratory cycles.
2.	Students should be able to measure tidal volume and be able to calculate breathing rate.
3.	Students should be ale to use the Analysis window to calculate Max and Min dv/dt.
4.	Students will determine FVC, FEV1 and FEV3 and the FEV/FVC ratios.
5.	Students will also determine the effect of breathing with a corset on and breathing through a narrowed airway.
6.	Students will record and measure lung volumes during these tasks and answer questions based on the data collected.
7.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window.

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have recorded recognizable respiratory cycles.
2.	be able to measure and calculate breathing rates, breathing parameters and specific ratios.
3.	be able to determine the effects of restriction and obstruction on lung volumes and breathing rate.
4.	understand the differences between restrictive and obstructive airway diseases.
5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
6.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
Human PsychoPhysiology -Goals and OutcomesEquipment RequiredIncluded with following KitsGoals and Outcomes
HP-01: The Electroencephalogram (EEG)
Study the EEG in a variety of experimental conditions including alpha block and personality testing.
IX-TA-ROAM, , ROAM-B2A , A-HB-ROAM UHK-TR, UAHK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will learn to collect electroencephalogram (EEG) signals from the left and right cerebral hemispheres.
2.	Students will learn to recognize common EEG artifacts caused by movements such as eye blinks, facial muscle contractions, and head movement. 
3.	Students should be able to recognize and analyze Alpha and Beta EEG patterns associated with closed and open eye conditions; 
4.	Students will observe the Alpha block.
5.	Students will test an experimental hypothesis about relative levels of Alpha and Beta EEG waves in each hemisphere in two psychological states. 
6.	Students will test an experimental hypothesis about personality and EEG.
7.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have recorded recognizable EEG traces for Alpha and Beta waves on both the right and left cerebral hemispheres.
2.	be able to recognize common EEG artifacts.
3.	be able to determine the effects of eye conditions (open or closed) and Alpha block on an EEG recording.
4.	have tested a hypothesis and reached a conclusion about psychological states and brain hemisphere dominance.
5.	have taken personality profile test and explored a hypothesis about EEG and personality.
6.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
7.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
HP-02: Galvanic Skin Response and Emotion
Skin conductance during various emotional situations.
IX-TA-ROAM, , C-GSR-320 UHK-TR, UAHK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will learn to measure the tonic level of skin conductance, the frequency of spontaneous conductance responses, and the habituation of the skin conductance response. 
2.	Students will observe and measure the galvanic skin response (GSR) as an orienting response to being asked neutral content questions. 
3.	Students will observe and measure the GSR in response to questions with emotional content.
4.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have recorded GSR traces.
2.	be able to recognize changes in the GSR as a response to neutral content or emotional content questions.
3.	be able to determine and understand the effects of these questions on an individual’s GSR.
4.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
5.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
HP-03: Galvanic Skin Response and Deception, Coginitive Compliance and Vigilance
Skin conductance during a variety of different tasks.
IX-TA-ROAM, , C-GSR-320 UHK-TR, UAHK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will learn to measure the tonic level of skin conductance, the frequency of spontaneous conductance responses, and the habituation of the skin conductance response. 
2.	Students will observe and measure the galvanic skin response (GSR) as an orienting response to being asked neutral content questions. 
3.	Students will test an experimental hypothesis about deliberate deception, guilty knowledge, and the amplitude of the GSR.
4.	Students will test an experimental hypothesis about cognitive complexity and the latency of the GSR.
5.	Students will test an experimental hypothesis about personality, vigilance, and the lability of skin conductance levels.
6.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have recorded GSR traces.
2.	be able to recognize changes in the GSR as a response to neutral content questions and habituation.
3.	come to a conclusion after testing the hypothesis on deliberate deception and guilty knowledge. This will allow students to gain an understanding of the nature of Polygraph Tests. 
4.	come to a conclusion with regard to the hypotheses about cognitive complexity, personality and vigilance; and how these play a role in the GSR of individuals. 
5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
6.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
HP-04: Skin Temperature, Stress, Calming and Embarrassment
Looks at how stressful or calming situations and levels of embarrassment directly effect skin temperature.
IX-TA-ROAM, , PPG-320 , C-GSR-320 UHK-TR, UAHK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will learn to measure and record skin temperature.
2.	Students will observe and measure the changes in skin temperature during a mild psychosocial stressor, a mental arithmetic test. 
3.	Students will measure the effect of calming mental imagery in a biofeedback paradigm on skin temperature.
4.	Students will test an experimental hypothesis about embarrassability and, blushing and gender.
5.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have successfully calibrated the temperature probe and recorded skin temperature traces.
2.	be able to recognize changes in skin temperature as a result of a mild stressor and when using calming mental imagery.
3.	come to a conclusion with regard to the about gender and embarrassability, using changes in skin temperature as the correlating factor. 
4.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
5.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
HP-05A: Heart Rate and Blood Pressure
Looks at how stressful or calming situations and levels of embarrassment directly effect blood pressure and heart rate.
IX-TA-ROAM, , PPG-320 , BP-220 HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will learn to measure and record heart rate and blood pressure as a baseline measurement.
2.	Students will collect data and analyze heart rate and blood pressure changes during a stressful task and during a reaction time test. 
3.	Students will test a hypothesis that persons with high perceived shyness and behavioral inhibition have lower Vagal tone than persons with low perceived shyness. 
4.	Students will learn how these measurements coordinate with heart rate and breathing.
5.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have successfully calibrated the blood pressure cuff (sphygmomanometer) and recorded blood pressure and pulse.
2.	be able to recognize changes from baseline measurements in blood pressure and pulse rate during a stressful task and a reaction time test. 
3.	come to a conclusion with regard to these changes.
4.	come to a conclusion about shyness and the relationship with heart rate and breathing, and how this corresponds to vagal tone.
5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
6.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
HP-05B: Personality and Vagal Tone
Looks at personality and the effect on various vagal reactions.
IX-TA-ROAM, , PPG-320 , A-RM-220 UHK-TR, UAHK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will learn to measure and record heart rate and blood pressure as a baseline measurement.
2.	Students will collect data and analyze heart rate and blood pressure changes during a stressful task and during a reaction time test. 
3.	Students will test a hypothesis that persons with high perceived shyness and behavioral inhibition have lower Vagal tone than persons with low perceived shyness. 
4.	Students will learn how these measurements coordinate with heart rate and breathing.
5.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have successfully calibrated the blood pressure cuff (sphygmomanometer) and recorded blood pressure and pulse.
2.	be able to recognize changes from baseline measurements in blood pressure and pulse rate during a stressful task and a reaction time test. 
3.	come to a conclusion with regard to these changes.
4.	come to a conclusion about shyness and the relationship with heart rate and breathing, and how this corresponds to vagal tone.
5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
6.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
HP-05C: Vigilance and Reaction Time
Reaction time based on the subject's "vigilance" and vagal reactions.
IX-TA-ROAM, , PPG-320 , EM-220 HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will learn to measure and record heart rate and blood pressure as a baseline measurement.
2.	Students will collect data and analyze heart rate and blood pressure changes during a stressful task and during a reaction time test. 
3.	Students will test a hypothesis that persons with high perceived shyness and behavioral inhibition have lower Vagal tone than persons with low perceived shyness. 
4.	Students will learn how these measurements coordinate with heart rate and breathing.
5.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have successfully calibrated the blood pressure cuff (sphygmomanometer) and recorded blood pressure and pulse.
2.	be able to recognize changes from baseline measurements in blood pressure and pulse rate during a stressful task and a reaction time test. 
3.	come to a conclusion with regard to these changes.
4.	come to a conclusion about shyness and the relationship with heart rate and breathing, and how this corresponds to vagal tone.
5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
6.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
HP-06: Cynicism-Hostility and the Hot Reactor
Looks at personality and the effect on various reactions to different situations meant to provoke the subject.
IX-TA-ROAM, , PPG-320 , BP-220 HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will participate anonymously in a personality assessment for the cynicism/hostility personality trait.
2.	Students will learn to measure and record heart rate and blood pressure as a baseline measurement.
3.	Students will collect and analyze heart rate and blood pressure during a social issues debate and during a recovery to baseline period. 
4.	Students will test hypotheses about personality and changes in heart rate and/or blood pressure that may have occurred during the debate. 
5.	Students will learn how these measurements coordinate with being a “hot reactor”.
6.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have taken a personality profile test specifically designed to gauge hostile reactions to certain questions.
2.	have successfully calibrated the blood pressure cuff (sphygmomanometer) and recorded blood pressure and pulse.
3.	learn about current social issues, proper debate procedures and presenting in front of their peers.
4.	be able to recognize changes from baseline measurements in blood pressure and pulse rate during a debate on social issues.
5.	come to a conclusion about personality with regard to these changes.
6.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
7.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
HP-08: The Galvanic Skin Response (GSR) and Investigation into Cheating
Traditional "Lie Dectector" test, including a real example of a "cover-up".
IX-TA-ROAM, , PPG-320 , C-GSR-320 UHK-TR, UAHK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will learn to measure the tonic level of skin conductance, the frequency of spontaneous conductance responses, and the habituation of the skin conductance response. 
2.	Students will observe and measure the galvanic skin response (GSR) as an orienting response to being asked neutral content questions. 
3.	Students will observe and measure the GSR in response to questions with emotional content and about performing a certain task (lying or telling the truth).

4.	Students will measure skin conductance and form conclusions about “lie detector” tests based on the lab experiment.
5.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have recorded GSR traces.
2.	be able to recognize changes in the GSR as a response to neutral content or emotional content questions.
3.	be able to determine and understand the effects of these questions on an individual’s GSR.
4.	understand the nature of “lie detector” tests and be able to articulate whether these tests are accurate or inaccurate based on data collected.
5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
6.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
HP-09: Facial Expression Electromyograms (EMG) and Emotion
The study of facial EMG reactions to a variety of images.
IX-TA-ROAM, , ROAM-B2A HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will successfully record electromyograms (EMGs) from facial muscle groups, especially those involved in smiling and frowning.
2.	Students will gain an understanding of the muscle groups involved in making certain facial expressions.
3.	Students will study the subject’s emotional response while looking at a series of images based on EMG activity.
4.	Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the electric current from the nerves and the response of the muscle or muscle group being innervated. 
5.	Students should be able to measure the EMG produced and corresponding muscle activity.
6.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	understand and be able to record an EMG.
2.	understand how nerves send electrical signals to muscles to cause a response.
3.	be able to determine the relationship between EMG activity and smiling or frowning.
4.	have gained understanding of the relationship between emotion and certain muscle activity.
5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
7.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
HP-10: Visual Evoked Potentials (VEP)
Looking at different moving targets and how this effects the subjects eye/brain responses.
IX-TA-ROAM, , ROAM-B2A HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will set up equipment and image generator to be able to record electrical activity generating visual evoked potentials (VEPs).
2.	Students will learn how to record VEP activity from the subject while the eyes are closed.
3.	Students will identify the VEP pattern for both the left and right eyes while looking at a flashing checkerboard.
4.	Students will identify the VEP pattern for the both the left and right eyes while looking at a rotating dartboard pattern.
5.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	understand and be able to record a VEP from both left and right eyes.
2.	understand how nerves send electrical signals to cause a visual response.
3.	be able to determine the relationship between VEP activity and right vs. left eyes.
4.	be able to determine the difference in VEP activity using a flashing checkerboard and a rotating dartboard.
5.	have gained understanding of the latency and response time.
6.	understand what is happening physiologically during the latent period and evoked potential.
7.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
8.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
HP-11: Multisensory Reaction Times
Reaction times with and without electric stimulation.
IX-TA-ROAM, , C-HVS-SL2 , EM-220 HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR, NBK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will gain an understanding of a reflex arc and how the spinal cord and peripheral nerves function in the human body
2.	Students will be able to successfully record responses from subjects to auditory, visual, and other stimuli.
3.	Students should be able to measure the response time of their subjects to different cues and relate it to the functioning of the spinal nerves. 
4.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	understand and be able to draw a reflex arc.
2.	have recorded responses of subjects to a variety of stimuli.
3.	determine a subject’s response time to various cues.
4.	be able to determine the effect of different types of stimuli on response time.
5.         created and tested a hypothesis of their own design.
6.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
HP-12: Rubber Hand Illusion
The "Rubber Hand" illusion.
IX-TA-ROAM, , ROAM-B2A , C-GSR-320 , PPG-320 UHK-TR, UAHK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

Outcomes

HP-13: The Gaze Cue Paradigm
The Gaze-Cue paradigm with and without conflicting information.
IX-TA-ROAM, , EM-220 HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR, NBK-TR,

Goals

Outcomes

HP-13A: The Gaze Cue Paradigm using Eye Tracker system
The Gaze-Cue paradigm with and without conflicting information.
IX-TA-ROAM, , EM-220 , A-iTRAX

Goals

Outcomes

HP-14: Hypothesis-driven Biofeedback Lab/Research Study
Uses a variety of techniques to train the body to use biofeedback.
IX-TA-ROAM, , ROAM-B2A , C-GSR-320 , PPG-320 , BP-220 , A-RM-220 , A-HB-ROAM UHK-TR, UAHK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will learn to measure and record skin temperature, GSR, pulse, and other parameters.
2.	Students will observe and measure the changes in a variety of during a mild stressor - heat, cold, imagery, etc.... 
3.	Students will measure the effect of calming mental imagery in a biofeedback paradigm on various physiological parameters.
4.	Students will test an experimental hypothesis of their own design.
5.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have successfully calibrated the temperature probe and recorded skin temperature, GSR, pulse and other traces.
2.	be able to recognize changes in parameters as a result of a mild stressor and when using calming mental imagery.
3.         have tested and analyzed their own hypothesis and drwan conclusions using statistical analyses.
4.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
5.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
HP-20: Listening to relaxing music to control tension.
Listening to relaxing music to control tension. What is the "most relaxing song?"
IX-TA-ROAM, , C-GSR-320 , PPG-320 , A-RM-220 UHK-TR, UAHK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

Outcomes

HP-21: Looking at vacation imagery to control tension.
How does looking at stressful imagery lessen when followed by looking at relaxing scenery images.
IX-TA-ROAM, , ROAM-B2A , PPG-320 , A-RM-220 , C-GSR-320 UHK-TR, UAHK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

Outcomes

HP-22: How does anticipating something affect your physiology; HR, temp, RR, etc...
Measure pulse and heart rate, skin temperature and respiration rate while waiting for something to happen (perhaps waiting for a scary video clip, or virtually riding a rollercoaster and waiting for that first drop) and then after the anticipation is over.
IX-TA-ROAM, , PPG-320 , A-RM-220 , ROAM-B2A , C-GSR-320 UHK-TR, UAHK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

Outcomes

HP-23: Using deception and famous faces to determine witness accuracy.
Researchers may soon be able to tell whether a suspect is lying about recognizing someone they know. Using eye tracking technology, they found that people's eyes moved in a different pattern when looking at faces they recognized rather than ones they have never seen before.
IX-TA-ROAM, , EM-220 , ROAM-B2A , A-iTRAX

Goals

Outcomes

HP-24: To determine whether alternative healing items really work physiologically.
Aromatherapy oils, Himalayan salt lamps, Negative Ioniziers, and magnetic bracelets, etc... may be needed depending on the hypothesis.
IX-TA-ROAM, , ROAM-B2A , PPG-320 , BP-220 , A-RM-220 , C-GSR-320 UHK-TR, UAHK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

Outcomes

HP-28: Listening to music to psych up before a sporting event.
How does listening to a "fight song" change a person's EEG levels?
IX-TA-ROAM, , ROAM-B2A , PPG-320 , A-HB-ROAM UHK-TR, UAHK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

Outcomes

HP-29: Determine, by looking at various male and female faces., why some are more attractive than others.
There is a science to all this attractiveness. There are a number of factors that go into who we think is attractive, including personality traits, interests and values and physical appearance. But when it comes to those immediate physical attractions, we often don’t really know why.
IX-TA-ROAM, , C-GSR-320 , PPG-320 , RPD-320 UHK-TR, UAHK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

Outcomes

HP-30: Uses neuro-feedback to control anxiety.
This lab uses EEG, meditation and scoring to see if brain wave activity can be controlled to lessen feeling of anxiety and it also brings in the challenge of having to compete with another subject.
IX-TA-ROAM, , ROAM-B2A , A-HB-ROAM UHK-TR, UAHK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

Outcomes

Human Kidney -Goals and OutcomesEquipment RequiredIncluded with following KitsGoals and Outcomes
HK-03: Show Osmosis and diffusion in a cell membrane
Determine if the membrane is permeable to different solutions.
IX-TA-ROAM, , ODC-320

Goals

Outcomes

Human PsychoPhysiology Tests -Goals and OutcomesEquipment RequiredIncluded with following KitsGoals and Outcomes
HP-15: Hypothesis-driven Prepulse Inhibition Lab/Research Study
“Hypothesis-driven” lab where students will come up with a series of sounds that they would like their subject to listen to order to elicit the subject's Prepulse Inhibition to a startle stimulus.
IX-TA-ROAM, , ROAM-B2A HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

Outcomes

HP-16: Eriksen Flanker Test
The "Eriksen Flanker" test - reaction time to congruent and incongruent situations.
IX-TA-ROAM, , RPD-320 UHK-TR, UAHK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

Outcomes

HP-17: Levels of Processing and Memory
Craik Memory Test shows how when something is related to something you already know, it is easier to commit to memory and recall
IX-TA-ROAM, , RPD-320 UHK-TR, UAHK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

Outcomes

HP-18: Posner Attention Test
Posner's Attention test is a psychological test used to assess attention and attention deficit. This task, formulated by Michael Posner, attempts to assess an individual’s ability to perform an attentional shift.
IX-TA-ROAM, , ROAM-B2A , EM-220 HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

Outcomes

HP-19: Lexical Decision Task
The Lexical Decision task is used to see if people can tell the difference between sequences of letters being real words or not.
IX-TA-ROAM, , RPD-320 UHK-TR, UAHK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

Outcomes

HP-25: When perceiving a stimulus, features are registered early and automatically, while objects are identified separately and later.
Colored letters are used in different locations on a field. Fast and accurate recognition of the whether the letter if present or not, or if a specific color of letter is present is one way to test this theory.
IX-TA-ROAM, , RPD-320 UHK-TR, UAHK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

Outcomes

HP-26: Searching for a curved letter around in a circle and any other letters they can remember.
This experiment asks observers to look for a curved letter (O, D, Q or G) presented in a circular format with distractor letters in place. The subject should report the curved letter first and then any other letters he or she can remember from the image shown. It is thought that if subjects reported the distractor letters adjacent to the first curved letter, this would indicate that attending to location is involved in the perception of individual features, and not only in their conjunction.
IX-TA-ROAM, , EM-220 HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR, NBK-TR,

Goals

Outcomes

HP-27: Images with a series of dots followed by an image of an arrow - is the arrow pointing do the dots?
The task is to determine, as quickly as possible, whether the arrow is pointing directly at any of the previously seen dots.
IX-TA-ROAM, , RPD-320 UHK-TR, UAHK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

Outcomes

HP-30: ExperimentBuilder : Automate your own experiment with Macros
ExperimentBuilder : Automate your own experiment with Macros
IX-TA-ROAM, HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR, NBK-TR,

Goals

Outcomes

Animal Muscle -Goals and OutcomesEquipment RequiredIncluded with following KitsGoals and Outcomes
AM-02: Skeletal Muscle - Summation and Tetanus
Frog skeletal muscle, looking at recruitment, summation and tetanus with direct muscle stimulation.
IX-TA-ROAM, , FT-302 , A-BST-100 , A-FEM-7025 , A-STK-125 UAHK-TR,

Goals

 1.	Students will dissect a frog leg to extract the gastrocnemius muscle of the lower limb. 
 2.	Students will assemble the equipment needed to be able to stimulate the muscle and record muscle twitch. 
 3.	Students will understand the correlation between the stimulus, muscle twitch, and the strength of the stimulation on muscle contraction. 
 4.	Students will test summation and tetanus by repeatedly stimulating the muscle. 
 5.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
      1.  be able to successfully excise the gastrocnemius muscle of a frog’s leg.
 2.	have a better understanding of electrical stimulation of the muscle and the equipment used to perform such stimulation. 
 3.	gain an understanding of muscle stimulation and contraction (twitch) and how they relate to each other. 
 4.	successfully record muscle twitches from the gastrocnemius and correlate the reactions to stimulation to summation and tetanus. 
 5.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise. 
 6.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings. 
AM-03: Heart Muscle
Frog heart, looks at contractions during various experimental situations including temperature, ligature, and pharmaceuticals.
IX-TA-ROAM, , FT-302 , A-BST-100 , A-STK-125 AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, NBK-TR,

Goals

 1.	Students will dissect a frog to expose the heart. 
 2.	Students will assemble the equipment needed to be able to stimulate the heart and will record cardiac contractions. 
 3.	Students will understand the correlation between exogenous stimulus and heart muscle response. 
 4.	Students will gather data corresponding to normal heart rhythms. 
 5.	Students will test different parameters with regard to cardiac muscle function: 
◦	cold temperature. 
◦	epinephrine. 
◦	atropine. 
◦	isolation of the ventricle. 
 6.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	be able to successfully isolate the frog heart.
2.	have a better understanding of electrical stimulation of the heart muscle and the equipment used to perform such stimulation. 
3.	gain an understanding of normal cardiac muscle contraction. 
4.	stimulate and record cardiac muscle contractions to test a variety of hypotheses and reach scientific conclusions. 
5.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise. 
6.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings. 
AM-04: Uterine Motility with Displacement Transducer
Rat uterus - smooth muscle reactions.
IX-TA-ROAM, , DT-475 , STB-TR , A-TB-MXBLK , A-STK-125

Goals

 1.	Students will dissect a female rat to excise the uterus to be able to examine smooth muscle contractions. 
 2.	Students will assemble the equipment needed to be able to record smooth muscle contractions. 
 3.	Students will gather data corresponding to normal rhythmic smooth muscle contractions. 
 4.	Students will test different parameters with regard to uterine muscle function: 
◦	methergine. 
◦	acetylcholine. 
◦	atropine. 
◦	epinephrine. 
◦	stretch and tension. 
 5.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
 1.  be able to successfully isolate the rat uterus.
 2.	activate and record uterine muscle contractions to test a variety of hypotheses and reach scientific conclusions. 
 3.	gain an understanding of rhythmic smooth muscle contractions. 
 4.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise. 
 5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings. 
AM-05B: Intestinal Motility with Force Transducer
Rat intestine. Looks at slow contractions of the intestinal muscles.
IX-TA-ROAM, , FT-302 , STB-TR , A-TB-MXBLK , A-STK-125

Goals

 1.	Students will dissect a rat to be able to examine smooth muscle contractions. 
 2.	Students will assemble the equipment needed to be able to record smooth muscle contractions. 
 3.	Students will gather data corresponding to normal rhythmic smooth muscle contractions. 
 4.	Students will test different parameters with regard to uterine muscle function: 
◦	acetylcholine. 
◦	atropine. 
◦	epinephrine. 
◦	serotonin,
◦	stretch and tension. 
 5.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	be able to record the spontaneous contractions of the intestine.
2.	describe any qualitative differences in the contractions produced by Acetylcholine, Epinephrine and other pharmaceuticals. 
3.	understand the difference between excitation and inhibition
4.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise. 
5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings. 
AM-06: Frog Electrocardiogram
Frog electrocardiogram.
IX-TA-ROAM, , IWIRE-B3G , C-ISO-F3 , A-STK-125 NBK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will dissect a frog to expose the heart. 
2.	Students will assemble the equipment needed to be able to stimulate the heart and will record cardiac contractions to look at an ECG. 
3.	Students will understand the correlation between external stimuli and heart muscle response. 
4.	Students will gather data corresponding to normal heart rhythms. 
5.	Students will test different parameters with regard to cardiac muscle function and ECG recordings: 
◦	cold temperature. 
◦	warm temperature.
◦	epinephrine. 
◦	acetylcholine. 
6.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	be able to successfully isolate the frog heart.
2.	gain an understanding of normal cardiac muscle contraction and normal amphibian ECG waves.
3.	record cardiac muscle ECG waves to test a variety of hypotheses and reach scientific conclusions. 
4.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise. 
5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings. 
AM-07: Crayfish Heart
Crayfish heart, looks at contractions during various experimental situations including temperature, ligature, and pharmaceuticals.
IX-TA-ROAM, , FT-302 , A-STK-125 AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, NBK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will dissect a crayfish to expose the heart. 
2.	Students will assemble the equipment needed to record cardiac contractions. 
3.	Students will understand the correlation between eternal stimuli and heart muscle response. 
4.	Students will gather data corresponding to normal heart rhythms. 
5.	Students will test different parameters with regard to cardiac muscle function: 
◦	cold temperature. 
◦	serotonin.
◦	GABA.
6.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	be able to successfully isolate the crayfish heart.
2.	gain an understanding of normal cardiac muscle contraction. 
3.	record cardiac muscle contractions to test a variety of hypotheses and reach scientific conclusions. 
4.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise. 
5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings. 
AM-08: Byssal Retractor Muscle
Can use mussels, clams, oysters or scallops for this lab looking at the contraction of the byssal muscle under various experimental conditions.
IX-TA-ROAM, , FT-302 , C-BNC-PN2 , A-STK-125 AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, NBK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will dissect a marine mussel (Mytilus sp.) to expose the byssal retractor muscle.
2.	Students will assemble the equipment needed to be able to stimulate the retractor muscle and will record muscle contractions to look at muscle twitch and responses to stimuli. 
3.	Students will be able to successively increase stimulation to cause changes in response of the muscle.
4.	Students will deliver differing doses of neurotransmitters to see the effects on an actively contracting muscle:
◦	acetylcholine.
◦	serotonin. 
5.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	be able to determine the relationship between the strength of the stimulus and the response of the muscle.
2.	be able to measure the amplitude of contraction produced in a muscle that is stimulated with a long current pulse, and repeated pulses delivered at progressively higher frequencies.
3.	understand the relationship between summation and tetanus.
4.	observe the effects of acetylcholine and serotonin, the neurotransmitters that effect contraction and relaxation of the anterior byssal retractor muscle.
5.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise and feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings. 
AM-09: Crayfish Gut Pharmacology
Crayfish intestinal movement. An invertebrate alternative to the rat intestine lab.
IX-TA-ROAM, , FT-302 , A-STK-125 AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, NBK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will dissect a crayfish abdomen to expose the gut and intestines.
2.	Students will assemble the equipment needed to be able to dose the intestine with different drugs and will record muscle contractions to observe responses both type and concentration of drug. 
3.	Students will deliver differing doses of excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters to see the effects on an actively contracting muscle:
◦	acetylcholine.
◦	epinephrine.
◦	GABA. 
4.	Measure and understand contraction amplitudes and durations.
5.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	be able to record the spontaneous contractions of the intestine.
2.	describe any qualitative differences in the contractions produced by Acetylcholine, Epinephrine and GABA. 
3.	understand the difference between excitation and inhibition
4.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise. 
5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings. 
AM-10: FrogNerveMuscle - Summation, Tetanus, and Fatigue in a Intact Nerve/Muscle Prep
Uses frog gastrocnemius muscle and sciatic nerve to look at recruitment, summation and tetanus.
IX-TA-ROAM, , FT-302 , C-BNC-PN2 , C-BNC-SE , A-TB-MXBLK , A-STK-125

Goals

 1.	Students will dissect a frog leg to extract the sciatic nerve and the muscles of the lower limb (either the gastrocnemius or tibialis anterior). 
 2.	Students will assemble the equipment needed to be able to stimulate the nerve and muscles, and record compound action potentials from both. 
 3.	Students will understand the correlation between nerve stimulus and muscle responses. 
 4.	Students will test synaptic delay between nerve and muscle compound action potentials. 
 5.	Students will test stimulus frequency, fatigue, and myoneural blocking.
 6.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
 1.	be able to successfully excise the sciatic nerve and muscles of a frog’s leg. 
 2.	have a better understanding of electrical stimulation of nerve fibers and the equipment used to perform such stimulation. 
 3.	gain an understanding of both nerve and muscle compound action potentials and how they relate to each other. 
 4.	record compound action potentials from the sciatic nerve and lower limb muscles to test a variety of hypotheses and reach scientific conclusions. 
 5.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise. 
 6.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings. 
AM-11: Earthworm Smooth Muscle Contractions
Earthworm gut contractions.
IX-TA-ROAM, , FT-302 , STB-TR , A-TB-MXBLK , A-STK-125

Goals

 1.	Students will dissect an earthworm to be able to examine smooth muscle contractions. 
 2.	Students will assemble the equipment needed to be able to record smooth muscle contractions. 
 3.	Students will gather data corresponding to normal rhythmic smooth muscle contractions. 
 4.	Students will test different parameters with regard to smooth muscle function: 
◦	acetylcholine. 
◦	serotonin
◦	epinephrine. 
5.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
 1.        be able to successfully isolate earthworm gut
 2.	activate and record uterine muscle contractions to test a variety of hypotheses and reach scientific conclusions. 
 3.	gain an understanding of rhythmic smooth muscle contractions. 
 4.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise. 
 5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings. 
AM-12: Crayfish Electrocardiogram
Study of the crayfish electrocardiogram.
IX-TA-ROAM, , IWIRE-B3G , C-ISO-F3 , A-STK-125 NBK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will dissect a crayfish to expose the heart. 
2.	Students will assemble the equipment needed to be able to stimulate the heart and will record cardiac contractions to look at an ECG. 
3.	Students will understand the correlation between external stimuli and heart muscle response. 
4.	Students will gather data corresponding to normal heart rhythms. 
5.	Students will test different parameters with regard to cardiac muscle function and ECG recordings: 
◦	cold temperature. 
◦	warm temperature.
◦	epinephrine. 
◦	acetylcholine. 
6.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	be able to successfully isolate the frog heart.
2.	gain an understanding of normal cardiac muscle contraction and normal crayfish ECG waves.
3.	record cardiac muscle ECG waves to test a variety of hypotheses and reach scientific conclusions. 
4.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise. 
5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings. 
hh-11: Skeletal Muscle - Weight and Work
Frog Muscle - How the muscle responds to the addition of weight. Recruitment and fatigue are also looked at.
IX-TA-ROAM, , DT-475 , A-BST-100 , A-FEM-7025 , A-STK-125

Goals

 1.	Students will dissect a frog leg to extract the gastrocnemius muscle of the lower limb. 
 2.	Students will assemble the equipment needed to be able to stimulate the muscle and record muscle twitch. 
 3.	Students will understand the correlation between the stimulus, the muscle twitch amplitude, and the effect of weight on muscle contractions. 
 4.	Students will test afterloading, supporting the weight before contraction; and preloading, hanging the weight on the muscle without support before the contraction. 
 5.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
 1.	be able to successfully excise the gastrocnemius muscle of a frog’s leg. 
 2.	have a better understanding of electrical stimulation of the muscle and the equipment used to perform such stimulation. 
 3.	gain an understanding of muscle stimulation and contraction (twitch) and how they relate to each other. 
 4.	record muscle twitches from the gastrocnemius, test a variety of hypotheses and reach scientific conclusions 
 5.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise. 
 6.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings. 
Animal Nerve -Goals and OutcomesEquipment RequiredIncluded with following KitsGoals and Outcomes
AN-01: Membrane Potentials
Introductory lab to intracellular recordings using crayfish.
IX-TA-ROAM, , IC-200 , A-STK-125 NBK-TR,

Goals

 1.	Students will dissect a crayfish tail to expose the fast extensor muscles. 
 2.	Students will assemble the equipment to record membrane potentials. 
 3.	Students will understand the Na+/K+ pump and how it works to keep membranes polarized for contraction. 
 4.	Students will test the hypothesis that all fibers within a single muscle are the same and therefore have the same membrane potentials. 
 5.	Students will also test the hypothesis that membrane potentials are dependent upon the concentration gradient of different ions. 
 6.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

 Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
 1.	be able to successfully expose the muscles of the crayfish tail and be able to distinguish between the different muscle types. 
 2.	have a better understanding of microelectrode recording from muscle fibers and the equipment used to perform such recordings. 
 3.	gain an understanding of the Na+/K+ pump and how it relates to membrane potentials. 
 4.	record membrane potentials from the different crayfish tail muscles to test a hypothesis and reach a scientific conclusion. 
 5.	test various saline solutions to determine if the concentration of K+ ions has any effect on muscle membrane potentials. 
 6.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings. 
 7.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise. 
AN-02: Compound Action Potentials
Frog compound action potential sunder various experimental conditions
IX-TA-ROAM, , IWIRE-B3G , NBC-501 , A-STK-125 AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, NBK-TR,

Goals

 1.	Students will dissect a frog leg to extract the sciatic nerve. 
 2.	Students will assemble the equipment needed to be able to stimulate the nerve and record compound action potentials from nerves. 
 3.	Students will understand the different types of fibers that make up the large sciatic nerve. 
 4.	Students will test different hypothesis with regard to nerve function: 
◦	Compound action potential: observing the one or more populations of different fiber types. 
◦	Stimulus-response/axon recruitment: observing how the nerve response changes with increased stimulus voltage. 
◦	Conduction velocity: measuring the speed at which action potentials propagate down the axons. 
◦	Effects of temperature: observing how cooling affects the nerve conduction velocity. 
◦	Bidirectionality:  determining whether axons conduct in both directions. 
◦	Refractoriness: observing how stimulus frequency affects the amplitude of compound action potentials 
◦	Strength-Duration: observing how the amplitude of a stimulus required to stimulate axons is related to the duration of the stimulus. 
 5.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

 Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
 1.	be able to successfully excise the sciatic nerve of a frog and be able to understand the different fiber types within the nerve. 
 2.	have a better understanding of electrical stimulation of nerve fibers and the equipment used to perform such stimulation. 
 3.	gain an understanding of compound action potentials and how they relate to nerve function. 
 4.	record compound action potentials from the sciatic nerve to test a variety of hypotheses and reach scientific conclusions. 
 5.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise. 
 6.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings. 
AN-03: Neuromuscular Studies
Frog - nerve and muscle prep looking at how the nerve and muscle interact with each other.
IX-TA-ROAM, , IWIRE-B3G , NBC-501 , A-STK-125 AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, NBK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will dissect a frog leg to extract the sciatic nerve and the muscles of the lower limb (either the gastrocnemius or tibialis anterior). 
2.	Students will assemble the equipment needed to be able to stimulate the nerve and muscles, and record compound action potentials from both. 
3.	Students will understand the correlation between nerve stimulus and muscle responses. 
4.	Students will test synaptic delay between nerve and muscle compound action potentials. 
5.	Students will test different drugs with regard to nerve and muscle function: 
◦	eserine. 
◦	curare. 
◦	atropine. 
◦	high acetylcholine concentration. 
◦	nicotine. 
◦	dantrolene. 
◦	high magnesium concentration. 
◦	high calcium concentration. 
6.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	be able to successfully excise the sciatic nerve and muscles of a frog’s leg. 
2.	have a better understanding of electrical stimulation of nerve fibers and the equipment used to perform such stimulation. 
3.	gain an understanding of both nerve and muscle compound action potentials and how they relate to each other. 
4.	record compound action potentials from the sciatic nerve and lower limb muscles to test a variety of hypotheses and reach scientific conclusions. 
5.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise. 
6.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings. 
AN-04: Action Potentials in Earthworm
Earthworm action potentials under various experiment conditions. A good invertebrate alternative to frog APs.
IX-TA-ROAM, , NBC-501 , IWIRE-B3G AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, NBK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will anesthetize an earthworm. 
2.	Students will assemble the equipment needed to be able to stimulate the nerve and record compound action potentials from nerves. 
3.	Students will understand the different types of fibers that make up the nerve. 
4.	Students will test different hypothesis with regard to nerve function: 
◦	Compound action potential: observing the one or more populations of different fiber types. 
◦	Stimulus-response/axon recruitment: observing how the nerve response changes with increased stimulus voltage. 

◦	Conduction velocity: measuring the speed at which action potentials propagate down the axons. 
◦	Effects of temperature: observing how cooling affects the nerve conduction velocity. 
◦	Bidirectionality:  determining whether axons conduct in both directions. 
◦	Refractoriness: observing how stimulus frequency affects the amplitude of compound action potentials 
◦	Strength-Duration: observing how the amplitude of a stimulus required to stimulate axons is related to the duration of the stimulus. 
7.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	be able to successfully anesthetize an earthworm.
2.	be able to understand the different fiber types within the nerve and record CAPs from that nerve. 
3.	have a better understanding of electrical stimulation of nerve fibers and the equipment used to perform such stimulation. 
4.	gain an understanding of compound action potentials and how they relate to nerve function. 
5.	test a variety of hypotheses and reach scientific conclusions. 
6.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise. 
7.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings. 
AN-05: Cockroach Leg Mechanoreceptors
This lab looks at the mechanoreceptors in the cockroach leg.
IX-TA-ROAM, , C-ISO-PN , IWIRE-B3G , A-STK-125 AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, NBK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will explore the basic characteristics of the chordotonal organs.
2.	Students will record their response to direction and intensity of leg movement, and determine if the responses are tonic or phasic.
3.	Students will learn the basic characteristics of tibial spines on the cockroach leg.
4.	Students will determine the effect of repeated stimulations on the frequency of action potentials.
5.	Students will also determine the effect of cold and warm temperatures on the neuronal response of mechanoreceptors to mechanical stimulation. 
6.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	understand the difference between tonic and phasic responses during flexion and extension.
2.	determine whether flexion or extension causes a greater response in action potential frequency, number, or response duration.
3.	determine if movement of the tibia spine in one direction or the other causes different responses in action potential frequency, number or duration.
4.	understand adaptation of responses.
5.	be able to explain how and why physiological processes are dependent on temperature in poikilotherms.
6.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise. 
7.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings. 
AN-07: Cockroach Cercal Sense Organs
Uses the cockroach for looking at the sense organs used for sensation and escape response.
IX-TA-ROAM, , IWIRE-B3G , C-ISO-H1 , C-BNC-PN2 , A-STK-125 , C-ISO-PN NBK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will assemble the equipment needed to be able to stimulate the cercal sense organs.
2.	Students will elicit a ventral nerve cord response to air puffs and become familiar the responses. 
3.	Students will explore the effects of stimulus intensity on the number and frequency of action potentials produced.
4.	Students will determine the number of hairs needed to trigger an action potential in the ventral nerve cord.
5.	Students will determine the effect of a continuous stimulus on the frequency of action potentials.
6.	Students will look at the response to a single stimulus after fairly complete adaptation. 
7.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	will be able to graph the response changes as a function of intensity.
2.	understand whether the response is a change as a function of intensity.
3.	be able to explain how the response differences would be important to the cockroach in its environment.
4.	be able to determine the minimum number of hairs required to elicit a response.
5.	understand the concept of adaptation and explain the importance to cockroach survival.
6.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise. 
7.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings. 
AN-10: Crustacean Stretch Receptors
Record responses from two different types of stretch receptors that are positioned next to the dorsal superficial extensor muscles in the tail of the crayfish.
IX-TA-ROAM, , IWIRE-B3G , A-SUCTIONELEC , A-STK-125 NBK-TR,

Goals

Outcomes

AN-12A: Crustacean Neuromuscular Junction
Crayfish - demonstrate the effect that electrical activity (action potentials) in a presynaptic cell has on the electrical activity (synaptic potentials) in a postsynaptic cell.
IX-TA-ROAM, , IWIRE-B3G , IC-200 , A-SUCTIONELEC , A-STK-125 NBK-TR,

Goals

Outcomes

AN-12B: Neuromuscular Junction in Crayfish - part B
Crayfish - demonstrate the effect that electrical activity (action potentials) in a presynaptic cell has on the electrical activity (synaptic potentials) in a postsynaptic cell.
IX-TA-ROAM, , IWIRE-B3G , IC-200 , A-SUCTIONELEC , A-STK-125 , C-BNC-P2 NBK-TR,

Goals

Outcomes

AN-13: Crayfish Motor Nerve
Crayfish - record the extracellular action potentials of crayfish motor axons. These spontaneously generated action potentials will be recorded using a suction electrode.
IX-TA-ROAM, , IWIRE-B3G , A-SUCTIONELEC , A-STK-125 NBK-TR,

Goals

Outcomes

Animal Metabolism Equipment RequiredIncluded with following KitsGoals and Outcomes
AMe-01-iWireGA: SmallAnimalRER-iWireGA
Mouse, rat, lizard, frog - comparison lab for looking at endo- and exotherm metabolism.
IX-TA-ROAM, , IWIRE-PEAK , AC-520 , A-1338-ED

Goals

1.	Students will distinguish between an ectothermic and endothermic animal.
2.	Students will assemble the equipment to be able to record accurate gas analysis measurements.
3.	Students will be able to place an animal in the small animal chamber.
4.	Students will be able to maintain animal health and well being during recording.
5.	Students will accurately analyze data to compare RER values between ectotherms and endotherms.
6.	An an option, students may record using animals cooled to lower than body temperature and RER will calculated as they return to normal body temperature or to room temperature.

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	determine mean RER of an endotherm at rest.
2.	determine the changes in CO2 and O2 volumes of an ectotherm. 
3.	make comparisons with the values obtained from an endotherm compared to an ectotherm.
4.	design optional experiments to compare other values from different animals.
Animal Fluid Balance Equipment RequiredIncluded with following KitsGoals and Outcomes
FB-01: Osmoregulation
Polychaete worms or regular garden slugs to study the effects of different osmolality on water regulation.
IX-TA-ROAM, , FT-302 AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, NBK-TR,

Goals

 1.	Students will weigh and observe polychaete worms in different marine salinity dilutions. 
 2.	Students will understand the correlation between saline concentration and osmoregulation in marine organisms. 
 3.	Students will determine the iso- hypo- and hyper- tonic environments based on the loss or gain of weight due to osmosis over time. 
 4.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

 1.	be able to accurately weigh living polychaete worms to determine weight changes due to osmosis. 
 2.	have a better understanding of osmoregulation and survival of marine organisms. 
 3.	understand the processes of osmosis and diffusion as they relate to living organisms. 
 4.	graph the weight changes of the worms in different salinity concentrations over time to be able to visually understand the concepts. 
 5.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise. 
 6.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings. 
BioInstrumentation -Goals and OutcomesEquipment RequiredIncluded with following KitsGoals and Outcomes
BI-01: ECG Signal Conditioning
Record ECG and signal condition using hardware filters on a breadboard as well as software filters, compare raw ECG to filtered ECG.
IX-TA-ROAM, , ROAM-B2A , A-BREADBOARD BIK-TR, UBIK-TR,

Goals

Outcomes

BI-02: EMG Signal Conditioning
Record EMG and signal condition using hardware filters on a breadboard as well as software filters,, compare raw EMG to filtered EMG.
IX-TA-ROAM, , ROAM-B2A , A-BREADBOARD BIK-TR, UBIK-TR,

Goals

Outcomes

BI-03: ECG Noise
Record ECG, with noise, identify the frequency of the noise and filter using various filters
IX-TA-ROAM, , ROAM-B2A , A-BREADBOARD BIK-TR, UBIK-TR,

Goals

Outcomes

BI-04: Frequency Response of Filters
Look at the frequency response of various filters both analog as well as digital filters.
IX-TA-ROAM, , A-BREADBOARD BIK-TR, UBIK-TR,

Goals

Outcomes

BI-05: Op-Amp Circuits
Study the behavior of various Op-amp circuits, using the stimulator
IX-TA-ROAM, , A-BREADBOARD BIK-TR, UBIK-TR,

Goals

Outcomes

BI-06: Arduino Claw
Control an Arduino Claw, from your EMG or grip force.
IX-TA-ROAM, , ROAM-B2A , FT-220 , A-CLAW-KIT UBIK-TR,

Goals

Outcomes

Cellular Metabolism -Goals and OutcomesEquipment RequiredIncluded with following KitsGoals and Outcomes
CM-01: Oxygen Consumption and Size
Goldfish or other small fish. Calculation of metabolism by looking at the consumption of O2 based on organism size.
IX-TA-ROAM, , DO2E-200

Goals

1.	Students will learn to accurately weigh small organisms.
2.	Students will learn to calibrate the dissolved oxygen sensor and measure the rate of oxygen consumption over time of different sized organisms. 
3.	Students will collect and analyze oxygen consumption curves to determine how oxygen consumption is related to the size of an organism. 
4.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have accurately measured the weight of small animals.
2.	have successfully calibrated the dissolved oxygen sensor and recorded the oxygen consumption over time of various sized organisms. 
3.	after analyzing the data collected, be able to relate oxygen consumption to size.
4.	come to a conclusion about any trends shown by this experiment.
5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
6.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
CM-02: Mitochondrial Metabolism
Uses mitochondria from liver and a spectrophotometer.
IX-TA-ROAM, HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR, NBK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will examine one step in the process of the Kreb’s Cycle of Cellular Respiration, the oxidation of succinic acid to fumaric acid. 
2.	Students will use a spectrophotometer to observe changes in the color of dye-labeled mouse liver extract in order to examine rate of reaction. 
3.	Students will perform three (3) separate experiments: one without cyanide, one in the presence of cyanide, and one using a competitive inhibitor to respiration. 
4.	Students will collect data, and use linear regression analysis to find the line of best fit for each set of reactions.
5.	Students will make a histogram to compare the rate of reaction of color change of the three experiments.

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	understand the process of Cellular Respiration at the mitochondrial level.
2.	be able to successfully use a spectrophotometer to measure color changes over time.
3.	understand the concept of competitive inhibition.
4.	be able to explain what cyanide does to the rate of a cellular respiration reaction.
5.	analyze data and design a histogram for data comparison.
6.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
7.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
CM-03: Mitochondrial Respiration
Mouse liver mitochondria for looking at cellular respiration under a variety of experimental conditions.
IX-TA-ROAM, , DO2E-200 , RPC-100

Goals

1.	Students will examine the electron transport process of mitochondrial respiration.
2.	Students will use a dissolved oxygen electrode and cellular respiration chamber to observe changes in the amount of dissolved oxygen in a solution of mitochondria order to examine rate of reaction. 
3.	Students will perform experiments using couplers, uncouplers, inhibitors and donors to see the effects on cellular respiration.
4.	Students will collect and analyze data to determine the effects of various chemicals on the respiration process.

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	understand the process of Cellular Respiration at the mitochondrial level.
2.	be able to successfully use a dissolved oxygen probe to measure oxygen concentration changes over time.
3.	understand the concept of competitive inhibition how donors, coupler and uncouplers work within the cellular metabolism process. 
4.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
5.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
CM-04: Photosynthesis
Photoreceptors from thylakoids - looking at photosynthesis under a variety of experimental conditions.
IX-TA-ROAM, , DO2E-200 , RPC-100

Goals

1.	Students will examine the process of photosynthesis using isolated thylakoids from chloroplasts.
2.	Students will use a dissolved oxygen electrode and photosynthesis chamber to observe changes in the amount of dissolved oxygen in a thylakoid solution in order to examine rate of reaction. 
3.	Students will learn how to measure the functionality of isolated thylakoids and how to measure electron transport in a complete photosystem. 
4.	Students will also learn how to measure electron transport in a single photosystem (PS I).
5.	Students will collect and analyze data to determine the effects of various chemicals on the photosynthetic process.
6.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	understand the process of Photosynthesis at the level of chloroplasts and photosystems within isolated plant organelles.
2.	be able to successfully use a dissolved oxygen probe to measure oxygen concentration changes over time.
3.	understand how uncouplers affect oxygen production rates in terms of phosphorylation, electron transport and chemiosmosis.
4.	understand the relationship between light intensity and the rate of oxygen production in the whole electron transport process and in a single photosystem. 
5.	be able to compare coupled and uncoupled reactions between different experiments.
6.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
7.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
CM-05: CO2 Fixation
Photoreceptors from thylakoids - looking at carbon dioxide fixation under a variety of experimental conditions.
IX-TA-ROAM, , DO2E-200 , RPC-100

Goals

1.	Students will examine the process of carbon dioxide fixation using intact algal cells.
2.	Students will use a dissolved oxygen electrode and photosynthesis chamber to observe changes in the amount of dissolved oxygen in a thylakoid solution in order to examine rate of reaction. 
3.	Students will use three compounds to compare the effect on the rate of carbon dioxide fixation in intact cells:
◦	Iodoacetamide (IAA), which inhibits certain enzymes of the Calvin cycle, but should have no effect on photosynthetic electron transport. 
◦	3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), which blocks electron transport between the Qa and Qb quinones in the chain. 
◦	Methylamine (MA), which should increase the rate of electron transport by uncoupling ATP synthesis from electron transport. 
4.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window.

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	understand the process of Photosynthesis and CO2 fixation in intact algal cells.
2.	be able to successfully use a dissolved oxygen probe to measure oxygen concentration changes over time.
3.	understand how uncouplers affect oxygen production rates in terms of phosphorylation, electron transport and chemiosmosis.
4.	understand the relationship between CO2 fixation in intact algal cells in both the dark and light; and the rate of oxygen production during the Calvin Cycle. 
5.	be able to compare oxygen production in algal cells and isolated thylakoids using the different chemicals.
6.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
7.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
CM-06: Whole Pant Gas Analysis
Uses an entire intact plant (gerbera daisy or the like) to look at photosynthesis in both light and dark conditions.
IX-TA-ROAM, , IWIRE-PEAK , AC-520

Goals

1.	Students will assemble the equipment to be able to record accurate gas analysis measurements.
2.	Students will determine the rate of oxygen production and carbon dioxide utilization in a photosynthesizing organism.
3.	Students will accurately analyze REE values.
4.	An an option, students may record:
◦	A plant a room temperature and compare to a plant at either high or low temperature.
◦	A plant contained in one concentration of CO2 compared to a plant in a higher concentration of CO2. 
◦	A plant with the light shining on the leaves to a plant in the dark. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	determine mean REE of a plant.
2.	determine the changes in CO2 and O2 concentrations over time. 
3.	make comparisons with the values obtained under different circumstances.
4.	Use advanced analysis features to gather mathematical data.
CM-07: Oxygen Consumption and Aerobic Respiration
Goldfish or other small fish. Calculation of metabolism by looking at the consumption of O2 based on food consumption and temperature.
IX-TA-ROAM, , DO2E-200

Goals

1.	Students will learn to accurately weigh small organisms.
2.	Students will learn to calibrate the dissolved oxygen sensor and measure the rate of oxygen consumption over time of organisms under different metabolic conditions. 
3.	Students will collect and analyze oxygen consumption curves to determine how oxygen consumption is related to the diet or ambient temperature of an organism. 
4.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have accurately measured the weight of small animals.
2.	have successfully calibrated the dissolved oxygen sensor and recorded the oxygen consumption over time of organisms under various conditions. 
3.	after analyzing the data collected, be able to relate oxygen consumption to diet or ambient temperature.
4.	come to a conclusion about any trends shown by this experiment.
5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
6.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
General Biology-Ecology -Goals and OutcomesEquipment RequiredIncluded with following KitsGoals and Outcomes
GB-01: Biological Buffers
Looks at buffering effects of different solutions in the presence of acids and bases.
IX-TA-ROAM, , ISE-100

Goals

1.	Students will determine the buffering capabilities of a variety of solutions by measuring the pH of the solutions
2.	Students will compare buffering capabilities when the solutions are treated with either a weak acid or a weak base.
3.	Students will measure the pH changes that occur in deionized (DI) water, a buffered physiological saline, and another solution chosen from a list provided. 
4.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	understand the concept of pH and biological buffers.
2.	understand the importance of buffering capabilities in biological systems.
3.	be able to mathematically calculate percent change in pH and relate this to the addition of a weak acid or base to a buffered solution. 
4.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
5.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
GB-02: Membrane Permeability
Study membrane permeability using molecular size, pH and temperature.
IX-TA-ROAM, , ISE-100 , ODC-320

Goals

1.	Students will examine some of the properties of passive transport mechanisms across a simulated membrane.
2.	Students will learn to create a “cell” using dialysis tubing.
3.	Students will fill the “cells” with different solutions to understand the movement of ions across a cell membrane.
4.	Students will measure the change in pH of the water surrounding the simulated cell.
5.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	understand the concept of passive transport and the movement of ions across a cell membrane.
2.	be able to explain how the movement of large particles causes a change in pH.
3.	be able to understand the rate of diffusion of ions across the membrane.
4.	be able to explain the factors that could increase the rate of diffusion of an ion across a membrane.
5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
6.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
GB-03: Water Quality
Wet lab studying water quality - DO2 and pH
IX-TA-ROAM, , ISE-100 , DO2E-200

Goals

1.	Students will collect water samples from a variety of sources, like streams and ponds, around their community.
2.	Students will measure the temperature of the water at the site where it is collected.
3.	Students will measure the pH, dissolved oxygen concentration, and specific gravity of water samples.
4.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	be able to collect water samples from a wide variety of sources.
2.	be able to successfully use pH and DO2 electrodes to measure these parameters in a variety of water samples.
3.	understand how pH, dissolved O2 and specific gravity impact water quality.
4.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
5.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
GB-04: Ecological Balance
Balance of systems using DO2 in the presence of plants, fish or both.
IX-TA-ROAM, , ISE-100 , DO2E-200

Goals

1.	Students will create an environment into which a small aquatic animal, a goldfish, is introduced.
2.	Students will measure the changes in the dissolved oxygen concentration and the pH level of the water in which the fish is respiring. 
3.	Students will also create an environment into which a piece of aquatic plant is introduced.
4.	Students will measure the changes in the dissolved oxygen concentration and the pH level of the water when the plant is exposed to light and photosynthesis takes place. 
5.	Students will create an environment in which both the plant and fish are present.

6.	Students will measure the changes in the dissolved oxygen concentration and pH level of the ecosystem will be measured.
7.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	be able to create specific environments in which to measure pH and dissolved oxygen concentrations.
2.	be able to successfully use pH and DO2 electrodes to measure these parameters in three ecological environments.
3.	understand how pH, dissolved O2 impact the quality of an ecosystem and be able to determine which biological system is more balanced. 
4.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
5.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
GB-05: Acid Rain
Study the effects of different pollutants on the pH of various water samples.
IX-TA-ROAM, , ISE-100

Goals

1.	Students will generate the gases that create acid rain: carbon dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, and sulfur dioxide.
2.	Students will bubble the gases through water.
3.	Students will monitor the acidity of the water using a pH electrode.
4.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	understand the concept of pH and acid rain.
2.	understand the importance of regulating pH in biological systems.
3.	be able to mathematically calculate percent change in pH and relate this to the addition of an acid rain producing gases to water.
4.	explain why acid rain is deleterious to ecosystems and habitats.
5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
6.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
GB-06: Conductivity of Solutions
Study the conductivity of a variety of solutions and conditions.
IX-TA-ROAM, , CM-100

Goals

1.	Students will learn to use a conductivity meter.
2.	Students will calibrate the conductivity meter using standard solutions.
3.	Students will test the conductivity of various electrolytes.
4.	Students will study the effect of concentration on the conductivity of solutions.
5.	Students will graph the concentration vs. conductivity of the various solutions tested.

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	determine the conductivity of different electrolyte solutions.
2.	understand the effect of concentration on the conductivity of various solutions.
3.	understand the main contributor to the difference in conductivity values between the solutions tested.
4.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
5.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
GB-07: Venus Fly Trap Reactions
Study the action potentials of the Venus Fly Trap
IX-TA-ROAM, , ROAM-B2A , C-MS-VFT

Goals

Outcomes

Foundations Equipment RequiredIncluded with following KitsGoals and Outcomes
FL-01: Auditory and Visual Reflexes
The study of whether sight or sound stimuli cause a faster reaction time.
IX-TA-ROAM, , EM-220 HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR, NBK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will gain an understanding of a reflex arc and how the spinal cord and peripheral nerves function in the human body
2.	Students will be able to successfully record responses from subjects to auditory and visual stimuli.
3.	Students should be able to measure the response time of their subjects to different cues and relate it to the functioning of the spinal nerves. 
4.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	understand and be able to draw a reflex arc.
2.	have recorded responses of subjects to both auditory and visual stimuli.
3.	determine a subject’s response time to various cues.
4.	be able to determine the effect of different types of auditory cues on response time.
5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
6.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
FL-02: Exercise, the ECG and Peripheral Circulation
ECG and the effects of moderate exercise
IX-TA-ROAM, , ROAM-B2A , PPG-320 HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will be able to successfully record a three-lead Electrocardiogram (ECG) and examine the relationship between the ECG and the peripheral circulation. 
2.	Students will be able to record and look at the effects of exercise on an ECG and pulse in different subjects during the lab period. 
3.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have recorded a recognizable ECG.
2.	have been able to interpret an ECG, especially the individual P and T waves, and the QRS complex.
3.	be able to calculate the heart rate of an individual from the recorded data.
4.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
5.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values for arterial pulse amplitude and heart rate, and the amplitudes of various ECG waves. 
6.	have been able to examine and interpret the effects of exercise on ECG and pulse amplitudes and timing.
FL-03: Grip Strength and the Electromyogram
Looks at EMG, strength and fatigue
IX-TA-ROAM, , ROAM-B2A , FT-220 HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will successfully record electromyograms (EMGs).
2.	Students will learn how to calibrate a dynamometer and convert pounds to kilograms.
3.	Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the electric current from the nerves and the response of the muscle or muscle group being innervated. 
4.	Students should be able to measure the EMG produced and corresponding muscle force.
5.	Students will measure the force produced by the muscle in the dominant forearm.
6.	Students will also study and measure the effect of fatigue on the muscles in the dominant and non-dominant forearms. Comparison of the measurement will also be examined. 
7.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	understand and be able to record an EMG.
2.	understand how nerves send electrical signals to muscles to cause a response.
3.	be able to determine the relationship between nerve impulses and the resulting EMG recording.
4.	have gained understanding of the responses in the dominant forearm, and the correlation between fatigue and muscle strength. 
5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
6.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
FL-04: Breathing Parameters at Rest and After Exercise
Lung volumes before and after exercise
IX-TA-ROAM, , A-FH-300 HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, UBIK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will be able to successfully record respiratory cycles.
2.	Students should be able to measure respiration volumes including: tidal volume, reserve capacities, vital capacity, and be able to calculate overall lung volume. 
3.	Students will be able to determine the difference in lung volumes of a subject at rest, immediately after exercise, and up to a few minutes after exercise. 
4.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have recorded a recognizable respiratory cycle at rest.
2.	have recorded recognizable respiratory cycles on an individual immediately after exercise and a few minutes after exercise.
3.	be able to determine the respiratory volumes of an individual from the recorded data and understand the effects of exercise on lung volumes. 
4.	determine a subject’s overall fitness and lung health after examining breathing rate recovery from exercise.
5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
6.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
FL-05: Blood Pressure, Peripheral Circulation and Body Position
Blood pressure looking at various positions of the body
IX-TA-ROAM, , BP-220 , PPG-320 HK-TR, UHK-TR, AHK-TRiw, UAHK-TR, HEK-TR, BIK-TR, UBIK-TR, PK-TR,

Goals

1.	Students will be able to successfully record pulse waves using a plethysmograph, and blood pressure using a non-invasive blood pressure cuff (sphygmomanometer). 
2.	Students will be able to interpret data from these recordings and understand the difference between systolic and diastolic blood pressure. 
3.	Students will look at the effects of different cuff and body positions on pulse and blood pressure.
4.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have successfully calibrated a non-invasive blood pressure cuff.
2.	have recorded recognizable pulse and blood pressure waves and be able to calculate the pulse rate and blood pressure of an individual from the recorded data. 
3.	have been able to interpret the effects of different cuff and body positions on both pulse and blood pressure.
4.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.

What our friends have to say

Textbooks using iWorx

Meet With Us

Quick online consultation with an Applications Specialist

Design Your System

Choose the parameters you want to Measure

ECG/EKG
EMG : Number of Channels
Invasive BP : Number of Channels
Non-Invasive BP : Number of Channels
Flow : Number of Channels
Temperature: Number of Channels
Force: Number of Channels
Stimulation: Describe the type

Recover Password

We will contact you with your login info. 

Newsletter Signup