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Psychological Testing Using – Experiment Builder

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Psychological testing is the administration of tests that are designed to be “objective and standardized” and a measure of certain types of behavior. Behavior often refers to an individual’s performance on tasks that have been designated beforehand. The behavior that make up a “pencil-and-paper” type test, for example, are usually based on a series of items. Performance on these items produces a test score. A score on a well-constructed test is believed to reflect a psychological construct such as: achievement, cognitive
ability, aptitude, emotional functioning, personality, and many others. Differences in test scores are thought to reflect individual differences in the construct the test is supposed to measure. The science behind psychological testing is called psychometrics.

Building experiment protocols to match what you want to test is very important. Having the flexibility to design your own test by adding in images, sounds, videos and other file types is relevant for being able to look at the variables you are testing. iWorx not only offers a built-in Experiment Builder/Macros so you can design your own Psychological testing parameters, but also a number of interesting and relatable psychological tests, including: Stroop Effect, Eriksen Flanker, Craik Memory, Lexical Decision, and Posner Attention tests. All of these can be used for teaching and/or student research projects.

A psychological test is designed to measure unobserved constructs, also known as latent variables. These tests are typically, but not necessarily, a series of tasks or problems that the respondent has to solve. Psychological tests can resemble questionnaires, which are also designed to measure unobserved constructs, but differ in that they ask for a respondent’s maximum performance whereas a questionnaire asks for the respondent’s typical performance. A useful psychological test must be both valid (i.e: there is evidence to support the specified interpretation of the test results) and reliable (i.e: internally consistent or give consistent results over time, across raters, etc.).

A psychological test is designed to measure unobserved constructs, also known as latent variables. These tests are typically, but not necessarily, a series of tasks or problems that the respondent has to solve. Psychological tests can resemble questionnaires, which are also designed to measure unobserved constructs, but differ in that they ask for a respondent’s maximum performance whereas a questionnaire asks for the respondent’s typical performance. A useful psychological test must be both valid (i.e: there is evidence to support the specified interpretation of the test results) and reliable (i.e: internally consistent or give consistent results over time, across raters, etc.).

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In order for these tests to be both valid and reliable, it is important that respondees who are equal on the measured construct also have an equal probability of answering the test items accurately. For example, an item on a math test could be “In soccer, two players get a red card. How many players are left?”; this question requires both knowledge of soccer and mathematical ability to be answered correctly. Group members can also influence the chance of correctly answering items (differential item functioning). Tests are often constructed for a specific population, and this should be taken into account when administering tests. If a test is invariant to some group difference (ex: gender) in one population (ex: US) it does not automatically mean that it is also invariant in another population (ex: Saudi Arabia).

There are also tests based on Psychological assessment. This is similar to psychological testing but involves a more comprehensive assessment of the individual. Psychological assessment is a process that involves checking the integration of information from multiple sources, such as tests of normal and abnormal personality, tests of ability or intelligence, tests of interests or attitudes, as well as information from personal interviews. Collateral information is also collected about personal, occupational, or medical history, such as from records or from interviews with a variety of individuals. A psychological test is one of the sources of data used within the process of assessment; and more than one test may be used.

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