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Human Psychophysiology

Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, iWire-B3G , A-HB-iWire
Description: Study the EEG in a variety of experimental conditions including alpha block and personality testing.

Goals

1.	Students will learn to collect electroencephalogram (EEG) signals from the left and right cerebral hemispheres.
2.	Students will learn to recognize common EEG artifacts caused by movements such as eye blinks, facial muscle contractions, and head movement. 
3.	Students should be able to recognize and analyze Alpha and Beta EEG patterns associated with closed and open eye conditions; 
4.	Students will observe the Alpha block.
5.	Students will test an experimental hypothesis about relative levels of Alpha and Beta EEG waves in each hemisphere in two psychological states. 
6.	Students will test an experimental hypothesis about personality and EEG.
7.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have recorded recognizable EEG traces for Alpha and Beta waves on both the right and left cerebral hemispheres.
2.	be able to recognize common EEG artifacts.
3.	be able to determine the effects of eye conditions (open or closed) and Alpha block on an EEG recording.
4.	have tested a hypothesis and reached a conclusion about psychological states and brain hemisphere dominance.
5.	have taken personality profile test and explored a hypothesis about EEG and personality.
6.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
7.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, IWIRE-B3G , C-ISO-GSR
Description: Skin conductance during various emotional situations.

Goals

1.	Students will learn to measure the tonic level of skin conductance, the frequency of spontaneous conductance responses, and the habituation of the skin conductance response. 
2.	Students will observe and measure the galvanic skin response (GSR) as an orienting response to being asked neutral content questions. 
3.	Students will observe and measure the GSR in response to questions with emotional content.
4.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have recorded GSR traces.
2.	be able to recognize changes in the GSR as a response to neutral content or emotional content questions.
3.	be able to determine and understand the effects of these questions on an individual’s GSR.
4.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
5.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, IWIRE-B3G , C-ISO-GSR
Description: Skin conductance during a variety of different tasks.

Goals

1.	Students will learn to measure the tonic level of skin conductance, the frequency of spontaneous conductance responses, and the habituation of the skin conductance response. 
2.	Students will observe and measure the galvanic skin response (GSR) as an orienting response to being asked neutral content questions. 
3.	Students will test an experimental hypothesis about deliberate deception, guilty knowledge, and the amplitude of the GSR.
4.	Students will test an experimental hypothesis about cognitive complexity and the latency of the GSR.
5.	Students will test an experimental hypothesis about personality, vigilance, and the lability of skin conductance levels.
6.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have recorded GSR traces.
2.	be able to recognize changes in the GSR as a response to neutral content questions and habituation.
3.	come to a conclusion after testing the hypothesis on deliberate deception and guilty knowledge. This will allow students to gain an understanding of the nature of Polygraph Tests. 
4.	come to a conclusion with regard to the hypotheses about cognitive complexity, personality and vigilance; and how these play a role in the GSR of individuals. 
5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
6.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, TM-220 , iWire-B3G , C-ISO-GSR
Description: Looks at how stressful or calming situations and levels of embarrassment directly effect skin temperature.

Goals

1.	Students will learn to measure and record skin temperature.
2.	Students will observe and measure the changes in skin temperature during a mild psychosocial stressor, a mental arithmetic test. 
3.	Students will measure the effect of calming mental imagery in a biofeedback paradigm on skin temperature.
4.	Students will test an experimental hypothesis about embarrassability and, blushing and gender.
5.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have successfully calibrated the temperature probe and recorded skin temperature traces.
2.	be able to recognize changes in skin temperature as a result of a mild stressor and when using calming mental imagery.
3.	come to a conclusion with regard to the about gender and embarrassability, using changes in skin temperature as the correlating factor. 
4.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
5.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, PT-104 , BP-220
Description: Looks at how stressful or calming situations and levels of embarrassment directly effect blood pressure and heart rate.

Goals

1.	Students will learn to measure and record heart rate and blood pressure as a baseline measurement.
2.	Students will collect data and analyze heart rate and blood pressure changes during a stressful task and during a reaction time test. 
3.	Students will test a hypothesis that persons with high perceived shyness and behavioral inhibition have lower Vagal tone than persons with low perceived shyness. 
4.	Students will learn how these measurements coordinate with heart rate and breathing.
5.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have successfully calibrated the blood pressure cuff (sphygmomanometer) and recorded blood pressure and pulse.
2.	be able to recognize changes from baseline measurements in blood pressure and pulse rate during a stressful task and a reaction time test. 
3.	come to a conclusion with regard to these changes.
4.	come to a conclusion about shyness and the relationship with heart rate and breathing, and how this corresponds to vagal tone.
5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
6.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, PT-104 , A-RM-220
Description: Looks at personality and the effect on various vagal reactions.

Goals

1.	Students will learn to measure and record heart rate and blood pressure as a baseline measurement.
2.	Students will collect data and analyze heart rate and blood pressure changes during a stressful task and during a reaction time test. 
3.	Students will test a hypothesis that persons with high perceived shyness and behavioral inhibition have lower Vagal tone than persons with low perceived shyness. 
4.	Students will learn how these measurements coordinate with heart rate and breathing.
5.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have successfully calibrated the blood pressure cuff (sphygmomanometer) and recorded blood pressure and pulse.
2.	be able to recognize changes from baseline measurements in blood pressure and pulse rate during a stressful task and a reaction time test. 
3.	come to a conclusion with regard to these changes.
4.	come to a conclusion about shyness and the relationship with heart rate and breathing, and how this corresponds to vagal tone.
5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
6.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, PT-104 , EM-220
Description: Reaction time based on the subject’s “vigilance” and vagal reactions.

Goals

1.	Students will learn to measure and record heart rate and blood pressure as a baseline measurement.
2.	Students will collect data and analyze heart rate and blood pressure changes during a stressful task and during a reaction time test. 
3.	Students will test a hypothesis that persons with high perceived shyness and behavioral inhibition have lower Vagal tone than persons with low perceived shyness. 
4.	Students will learn how these measurements coordinate with heart rate and breathing.
5.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have successfully calibrated the blood pressure cuff (sphygmomanometer) and recorded blood pressure and pulse.
2.	be able to recognize changes from baseline measurements in blood pressure and pulse rate during a stressful task and a reaction time test. 
3.	come to a conclusion with regard to these changes.
4.	come to a conclusion about shyness and the relationship with heart rate and breathing, and how this corresponds to vagal tone.
5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
6.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, PT-104 , BP-220
Description: Looks at personality and the effect on various reactions to different situations meant to provoke the subject.

Goals

1.	Students will participate anonymously in a personality assessment for the cynicism/hostility personality trait.
2.	Students will learn to measure and record heart rate and blood pressure as a baseline measurement.
3.	Students will collect and analyze heart rate and blood pressure during a social issues debate and during a recovery to baseline period. 
4.	Students will test hypotheses about personality and changes in heart rate and/or blood pressure that may have occurred during the debate. 
5.	Students will learn how these measurements coordinate with being a “hot reactor”.
6.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have taken a personality profile test specifically designed to gauge hostile reactions to certain questions.
2.	have successfully calibrated the blood pressure cuff (sphygmomanometer) and recorded blood pressure and pulse.
3.	learn about current social issues, proper debate procedures and presenting in front of their peers.
4.	be able to recognize changes from baseline measurements in blood pressure and pulse rate during a debate on social issues.
5.	come to a conclusion about personality with regard to these changes.
6.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
7.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, IWIRE-B3G , PT-104 , C-ISO-GSR
Description: The Stroop Effect based on color and positional disparity. Interference of Stimuli on Associative Tasks

Goals

1.	Subjects will perform tasks that demonstrate the Stroop Effect
2.	Subjects will look at the effect of word stimuli on color naming, the effect of color stimuli on reading words, the effect of word stimuli on naming directions, and stimuli of your own choice or design. 
3.	Students will analyze how the completion time of each task is used as an indicator of the strength of the interference of the stimuli on the task. 
4.	Students will measure the heart rate and skin conductance level of each subject before, during, and after each task.
5.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window.

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	understand how activities can have an effect of skin conductance and heart rate.
2.	have an understanding how some tasks performed are considered “interference” tasks and be able to explain the physiology behind the reaction. 
3.	be able to make predictions and create their own hypothesis with regards to interference tasks.
4.	have tested and analyzed their hypothesis to see how it relates to other parameters tested.
5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
6.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, IWIRE-B3G , PT-104 , C-ISO-GSR
Description: Traditional “Lie Dectector” test, including a real example of a “cover-up”.

Goals

1.	Students will learn to measure the tonic level of skin conductance, the frequency of spontaneous conductance responses, and the habituation of the skin conductance response. 
2.	Students will observe and measure the galvanic skin response (GSR) as an orienting response to being asked neutral content questions. 
3.	Students will observe and measure the GSR in response to questions with emotional content and about performing a certain task (lying or telling the truth).

4.	Students will measure skin conductance and form conclusions about “lie detector” tests based on the lab experiment.
5.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have recorded GSR traces.
2.	be able to recognize changes in the GSR as a response to neutral content or emotional content questions.
3.	be able to determine and understand the effects of these questions on an individual’s GSR.
4.	understand the nature of “lie detector” tests and be able to articulate whether these tests are accurate or inaccurate based on data collected.
5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
6.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, IWIRE-B3G
Description: The study of facial EMG reactions to a variety of images.

Goals

1.	Students will successfully record electromyograms (EMGs) from facial muscle groups, especially those involved in smiling and frowning.
2.	Students will gain an understanding of the muscle groups involved in making certain facial expressions.
3.	Students will study the subject’s emotional response while looking at a series of images based on EMG activity.
4.	Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the electric current from the nerves and the response of the muscle or muscle group being innervated. 
5.	Students should be able to measure the EMG produced and corresponding muscle activity.
6.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	understand and be able to record an EMG.
2.	understand how nerves send electrical signals to muscles to cause a response.
3.	be able to determine the relationship between EMG activity and smiling or frowning.
4.	have gained understanding of the relationship between emotion and certain muscle activity.
5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
7.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, IWIRE-B3G
Description: Looking at different moving targets and how this effects the subjects eye/brain responses.

Goals

1.	Students will set up equipment and image generator to be able to record electrical activity generating visual evoked potentials (VEPs).
2.	Students will learn how to record VEP activity from the subject while the eyes are closed.
3.	Students will identify the VEP pattern for both the left and right eyes while looking at a flashing checkerboard.
4.	Students will identify the VEP pattern for the both the left and right eyes while looking at a rotating dartboard pattern.
5.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	understand and be able to record a VEP from both left and right eyes.
2.	understand how nerves send electrical signals to cause a visual response.
3.	be able to determine the relationship between VEP activity and right vs. left eyes.
4.	be able to determine the difference in VEP activity using a flashing checkerboard and a rotating dartboard.
5.	have gained understanding of the latency and response time.
6.	understand what is happening physiologically during the latent period and evoked potential.
7.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
8.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, C-HVS-SL2
Description: Reaction times with and without electric stimulation.

Goals

1.	Students will gain an understanding of a reflex arc and how the spinal cord and peripheral nerves function in the human body
2.	Students will be able to successfully record responses from subjects to auditory, visual, and other stimuli.
3.	Students should be able to measure the response time of their subjects to different cues and relate it to the functioning of the spinal nerves. 
4.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	understand and be able to draw a reflex arc.
2.	have recorded responses of subjects to a variety of stimuli.
3.	determine a subject’s response time to various cues.
4.	be able to determine the effect of different types of stimuli on response time.
5.         created and tested a hypothesis of their own design.
6.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, IWIRE-B3G , C-ISO-GSR , TM-220 , PT-104
Description: The “Rubber Hand” illusion.

Goals

Outcomes

Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, EM-220
Description: The Gaze-Cue paradigm with and without conflicting information.

Goals

Outcomes

Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, EM-220 , iTrax
Description: The Gaze-Cue paradigm with and without conflicting information.

Goals

Outcomes

Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, IWIRE-B3G , C-ISO-GSR , PT-104 , BP-220 , A-RM-220 , TM-220 , C-ISO-SC5 headstrap
Description: Uses a variety of techniques to train the body to use biofeedback.

Goals

1.	Students will learn to measure and record skin temperature, GSR, pulse, and other parameters.
2.	Students will observe and measure the changes in a variety of during a mild stressor - heat, cold, imagery, etc.... 
3.	Students will measure the effect of calming mental imagery in a biofeedback paradigm on various physiological parameters.
4.	Students will test an experimental hypothesis of their own design.
5.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	have successfully calibrated the temperature probe and recorded skin temperature, GSR, pulse and other traces.
2.	be able to recognize changes in parameters as a result of a mild stressor and when using calming mental imagery.
3.         have tested and analyzed their own hypothesis and drwan conclusions using statistical analyses.
4.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
5.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, iWire-B3G
Description: “Hypothesis-driven” lab where students will come up with a series of sounds that they would like their subject to listen to order to elicit the subject’s Prepulse Inhibition to a startle stimulus.

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Outcomes

Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, EM-220 , EM-220
Description: The “Eriksen Flanker” test – reaction time to congruent and incongruent situations.

Goals

Outcomes

Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, EM-220 , EM-220 , RPD-400 (opt)
Description: Craik Memory Test shows how when something is related to something you already know, it is easier to commit to memory and recall

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Outcomes

Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, iWire-B3G , EM-220 , iTrax (opt)
Description: Posner’s Attention test is a psychological test used to assess attention and attention deficit. This task, formulated by Michael Posner, attempts to assess an individual’s ability to perform an attentional shift.

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Outcomes

Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, EM-220 , EM-220 , RPD-400 (opt)
Description: The Lexical Decision task is used to see if people can tell the difference between sequences of letters being real words or not.

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Outcomes

Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, iWire-B3G , PT-104 , A-RM-220
Description: Listening to relaxing music to control tension. What is the “most relaxing song?”

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Outcomes

Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, iWire-B3G , PT-104 , A-RM-220
Description: How does looking at stressful imagery lessen when followed by looking at relaxing scenery images.

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Outcomes

Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, PT-104 , A-RM-220 , TM-220 , iWire-B3G
Description: Measure pulse and heart rate, skin temperature and respiration rate while waiting for something to happen (perhaps waiting for a scary video clip, or virtually riding a rollercoaster and waiting for that first drop) and then after the anticipation is over.

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Outcomes

Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, EM-220 , iWire-B3G , iTrax
Description: Researchers may soon be able to tell whether a suspect is lying about recognizing someone they know. Using eye tracking technology, they found that people’s eyes moved in a different pattern when looking at faces they recognized rather than ones they have never seen before.

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Outcomes

Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, iWire-B3G , PT-104 , BP-220 , A-RM-220 , TM-220
Description: Aromatherapy oils, Himalayan salt lamps, Negative Ioniziers, and magnetic bracelets, etc… may be needed depending on the hypothesis.

Goals

Outcomes

Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, RPD-400
Description: Colored letters are used in different locations on a field. Fast and accurate recognition of the whether the letter if present or not, or if a specific color of letter is present is one way to test this theory.

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Outcomes

Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, EM-220
Description: This experiment asks observers to look for a curved letter (O, D, Q or G) presented in a circular format with distractor letters in place. The subject should report the curved letter first and then any other letters he or she can remember from the image shown. It is thought that if subjects reported the distractor letters adjacent to the first curved letter, this would indicate that attending to location is involved in the perception of individual features, and not only in their conjunction.

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Outcomes

Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, RPD-400
Description: The task is to determine, as quickly as possible, whether the arrow is pointing directly at any of the previously seen dots.

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Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, iWire-B3G , PT-104 , C-ISO-SC5
Description: How does listening to a “fight song” change a person’s EEG levels?

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Outcomes

Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, IWIRE-B3G , C-ISO-GSR , PT-104 , TM-220 , RPD-400
Description: There is a science to all this attractiveness. There are a number of factors that go into who we think is attractive, including personality traits, interests and values and physical appearance. But when it comes to those immediate physical attractions, we often don’t really know why.

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Outcomes

Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, iWire-B3G , A-HB-iWire
Description: This lab uses EEG, meditation and scoring to see if brain wave activity can be controlled to lessen feeling of anxiety and it also brings in the challenge of having to compete with another subject.

Goals

Outcomes

Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, iWire-B3G , C-ISO-SC5 Headstrap
Description: This lab uses EEG, meditation and scoring to see if brain wave activity can be controlled to lessen feeling of anxiety and it also brings in the challenge of having to compete with another subject.

Goals

Outcomes

Updated on April 18, 2021
Table of Contents

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ECG/EKG
EMG : Number of Channels
Invasive BP : Number of Channels
Non-Invasive BP : Number of Channels
Flow : Number of Channels
Temperature: Number of Channels
Force: Number of Channels
Stimulation: Describe the type

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