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Human Muscle

Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, IWIRE-B3G , FT-220
Description: Looks at EMG, strength and fatigue.

Goals

1.	Students will successfully record electromyograms (EMGs).
2.	Students will learn how to calibrate a dynamometer and convert pounds to kilograms.
3.	Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the electric current from the nerves and the response of the muscle or muscle group being innervated. 
4.	Students should be able to measure the EMG produced and corresponding muscle force.
5.	Students will measure the force produced by the muscle in both the dominant and non-dominant forearms.
6.	Students will also study and measure the effect of fatigue on the muscles in the dominant and non-dominant forearms. Comparison of the measurement will also be examined. 
7.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	understand and be able to record an EMG.
2.	understand how nerves send electrical signals to muscles to cause a response.
3.	be able to determine the relationship between nerve impulses and the resulting EMG recording.
4.	have gained understanding of the reasons for different responses in the dominant and non-dominant forearm, and the correlation between fatigue and muscle strength. 
5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
6.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, IWIRE-B3G
Description: EMG activity in antagonistic muscles.

Goals

1.	Students will successfully record electromyograms (EMGs) from antagonistic muscle groups in both the forearm and lower leg.
2.	Students will learn how levers, fulcrums, and load affect the workings of antagonistic muscles.
3.	Students will gain an understanding of the muscle groups involved in flexion, extension, dorsiflexion and plantar flexion.
4.	Students will use weights to put load on muscles groups while examining changes in the EMG.
5.	Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the electric current from the nerves and the response of the muscle or muscle group being innervated. 
6.	Students should be able to measure the EMG produced and corresponding muscle force.
7.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	understand and be able to record an EMG.
2.	understand how nerves send electrical signals to muscles to cause a response.
3.	be able to determine the relationship between antagonistic muscles during movement.
4.	have gained understanding of the relationship between load and muscle activity.
5.	have measured the EMG force difference between muscle groups without and without lifting a weight.
6.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
7.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, IWIRE-B3G
Description: Electroculogram – looks at the muscle activity while doing a variety of different tasks including pursuit and vergences.

Goals

1.	Students will successfully record electroculograms (EOGs) from the oculomotor muscle group of the eye.
2.	Students will learn how the six oculomotor muscles control eye movement during saccades, pursuit, the vestibular ocular reflex (VOR), and vergence. 
3.	Students will perform tasks that will generate electrical activity in oculomotor muscles that are unique to each of four different types of eye movement (saccades, VOR, pursuit, and vergence). 
4.	Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the electric current from the nerves and the response of the muscle or muscle group being innervated. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	understand and be able to record an EOG.
2.	understand how nerves send electrical signals to muscles to cause a response.
3.	be able to determine the relationship between saccades and reading; pursuit and following a moving target; VOR and head rotation; and vergence and focusing near to far. 
4.	have measured the EOG amplitude to determine the motion of the subject’s eyes during various oculomotor activities.
5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
6.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, IWIRE-B3G , SMT-220 , C-HVS-SL2
Description: Use the built in stimulator to look at threshold, work, summation, incomplete and complete tetanus in muscles.

Goals

1.	Students will learn how to apply a stimulus pulse to human muscle to elicit a muscular contraction.
2.	Students will record finger twitches to be able to recognize contraction and relaxation times and twitch amplitudes.
3.	Students will demonstrate the effect of increasing stimulus strength on the strength of a muscle contraction, the effect of 
•	increasing weight on twitch amplitude and work of a preloaded muscle, 
•	increasing the frequency of stimulation on the contraction strength and muscle fatigue. 
4.	Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the electric current from the nerves and the response of the muscle or muscle group being innervated. 
5.	Students should be able to measure the EMG produced and corresponding muscle force.
6.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	understand and be able to record a simple finger twitch.
2.	understand how nerves send electrical signals to muscles to cause a response.
3.	be able to determine the relationship between stimulus and muscle twitch amplitudes.
4.	understand the concepts of muscle recruitment, fatigue, summation, and tetanus
5.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
6.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, GN-100
Description: Allows determination of the range of motion and flexibility of the subject. Looks at hypo- and hyper- extension situations.

Goals

1.	Students will successfully record electromyograms (EMGs) from antagonistic muscle groups in both the forearm and lower leg.
2.	Students will learn how levers, fulcrums, and load affect the workings of antagonistic muscles.
3.	Students will gain an understanding of the muscle groups involved in flexion, extension, dorsiflexion and plantar flexion.
4.	Students will use a goniometer to measure angle of motion and flexibility of muscle groups.
5.	Students will gain an understanding of how the range of motion determines the joint’s functionality.
6.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	understand and be able to record an EMG.
2.	understand how flexibility and range of motion are used by physical therapists and athletic trainers when looking at joint dysfunction.. 
3.	be able to determine the relationship between antagonistic muscles during movement and how that related to range of motion..
4.	understand how flexion and extension of joints with and without weights affects the range of motion of that joint.
5.	gain an understanding of why different joints have different flexibilities and ranges of motion in certain directions.
6.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
7.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, IWIRE-B3G , GN-100 , C-HVS-SL2
Description: Uses the simulator to see what happens when you stimulate antagonistic muscles.

Goals

1.	Students will learn how to apply a stimulus pulse to human muscle to elicit a muscular contraction.
2.	Students will record finger twitches to be able to recognize contraction and relaxation times and twitch amplitudes.
3.	Students will gain an understanding of the muscle groups involved in flexion, extension, dorsiflexion and plantar flexion.
4.	Students will use a goniometer to measure angle of motion and flexibility of muscle groups.
5.	Students will gain an understanding of how the range of motion determines the joint’s functionality.
6.	Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the electric current from the nerves and the response of the muscle or muscle group being innervated. 
7.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	understand and be able to record a simple muscle twitch.
2.	understand how nerves send electrical signals to muscles to cause a response.
3.	be able to determine the relationship between stimulus and muscle twitch amplitudes.
4.	understand contraction and relaxation times of muscles.
5.	understand how stimulus frequency compares to the ranges of motion for dorsiflexion and plantar flexion of the foot, and flexion and extension of both the wrist, elbow and knee. 
6.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
7.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, IWIRE-B3G , GN-100
Description: EMG, flexibility and range of motion of different joints and muscles.

Goals

1.	Students will successfully record electromyograms (EMGs) from antagonistic muscle groups in both the forearm and lower leg.
2.	Students will learn how levers, fulcrums, and load affect the workings of antagonistic muscles.
3.	Students will gain an understanding of the muscle groups involved in flexion, extension, dorsiflexion and plantar flexion.
4.	Students will use a goniometer to measure angle of motion and flexibility of muscle groups.
5.	Students will gain an understanding of how the range of motion determines the joint’s functionality.
6.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	understand and be able to record an EMG.
2.	understand how flexibility and range of motion are used by physical therapists and athletic trainers when looking at joint dysfunction.. 
3.	be able to determine the relationship between antagonistic muscles during movement and how that related to range of motion..
4.	understand how flexion and extension of joints with and without weights affects the range of motion of that joint.
5.	gain an understanding of why different joints have different flexibilities and ranges of motion in certain directions.
6.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
7.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, IWIRE-B3G
Description: EMG activity while the subjects are arm-wrestling.

Goals

1.	Students will successfully record electromyograms (EMGs) from antagonistic muscle groups in the forearm, upper arm and shoulder.
2.	Students will learn how levers, fulcrums, and load affect the workings of antagonistic muscles.
3.	Students will gain an understanding of the muscle groups involved in flexion and extension while performing a specific task.
4.	Students will put load on muscles groups while examining changes in the EMG.
5.	Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the muscle action and function using preselected muscles and then using muscles groups for studying their own hypotheses. 
6.	Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the electric current from the nerves and the response of the muscle or muscle group being innervated. 
7.	Students should be able to measure the EMG produced and corresponding muscle force.
8.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window.

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	understand and be able to record an EMG.
2.	understand how nerves send electrical signals to muscles to cause a response.
3.	be able to determine the relationship between antagonistic muscles during movement.
4.	have gained understanding of the relationship between load and muscle activity.
5.	have measured the EMG force difference between muscle groups while performing a specific task.
6.	have designed optional experiments or muscle groups and test varied hypotheses.
7.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
8.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, IWIRE-B3G
Description: EMG in “active” muscle groups to make sure that the exercise routine is being done properly.

Goals

1.	Students will successfully record electromyograms (EMGs) from muscle groups in leg.
2.	Students will learn how levers, fulcrums, and load affect the workings of  muscles.
3.	Students will gain an understanding of the muscle groups involved in flexion, extension,  abduction, adduction, etc...
4.	Students will use weights to put load on muscles groups while examining changes in the EMG.
5.	Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the electric current from the nerves and the response of the muscle or muscle group being innervated. 
6.	Students should be able to measure the EMG produced and corresponding muscle force.
7.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	understand and be able to record an EMG.
2.	understand how nerves send electrical signals to muscles to cause a response.
3.	be able to determine the relationship between different muscles during movement.
4.	have gained understanding of the relationship between load and muscle activity.
5.	have measured the EMG force difference between muscle groups without and without doing a specific activity.
6.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
7.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, IWIRE-B3G
Description: Intestinal activity in humans before and after eating.

Goals

Outcomes

Included with:
Lab Equipment Required: IX-TA, IWIRE-B3G , IWIRE-B3G
Description: EMG in both subjects during arm wrestling.

Goals

1.	Students will successfully record electromyograms (EMGs) from antagonistic muscle groups in the forearm, upper arm and shoulder.
2.	Students will learn how levers, fulcrums, and load affect the workings of antagonistic muscles.
3.	Students will gain an understanding of the muscle groups involved in flexion and extension while performing a specific task.
4.	Students will put load on muscles groups while examining changes in the EMG.
5.	Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the muscle action and function using preselected muscles and then using muscles groups for studying their own hypotheses. 
6.	Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between the electric current from the nerves and the response of the muscle or muscle group being innervated. 
7.	Students should be able to measure the EMG produced and corresponding muscle force.
8.	Students will continue to be successful at using the LabScribe software to move cursors, analyze data, record data to the Journal, and add functions to the Analysis window. 

Outcomes

Students who have successfully completed this exercise will:
1.	understand and be able to record an EMG.
2.	understand how nerves send electrical signals to muscles to cause a response.
3.	be able to determine the relationship between antagonistic muscles during movement.
4.	have gained understanding of the relationship between load and muscle activity.
5.	have measured the EMG force difference between muscle groups while performing a specific task.
6.	have designed optional experiments or muscle groups and test varied hypotheses.
7.	feel comfortable transferring data to the Journal and interpreting that data to answer questions about their recordings.
8.	have used the functions available in the Analysis window to determine values necessary for this exercise.
Updated on April 18, 2021

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